ivf marketing

Four Reasons the Tech Revolution Has Disrupted Fertility, and Why Practice Owners are Frustrated

By Griffin Jones

CHANGING TECHNOLOGY

Part 4 of a four part series on the main business challenges facing fertility centers because of the shift from "small clinic" to "entrepreneurial endeavor"

For some IVF centers, the change has already done them in. For others, it is the level playing field needed to thrive against massively funded competitors. No phenomenon presents a greater threat, nor a greater opportunity to today’s fertility centers than the technological revolution through which our society is living.

So far, we've deeply explored the four major implications of the following axiom: today's fertility practice is no longer a small, independent healthcare clinic, but an entrepreneurial venture. We talked about business structure, strategy and vision, and accelerated competition. These three tenets pale in comparison to our society’s rapidly changing technological and social behavior.

Eric Schmidt humanity doesnt understand internet quote.jpg

While all four of these elements have caused the tectonic shift from small healthcare office to entrepreneurial venture, none are more significant than this one, the drastic change of technology and society.

In this article, we mostly refer to consumer technology. Leave alone advances in medicine and laboratory technology, though their convergence may ultimately be indistinguishable. Rather than individually analyze various silos of the tech sector— such as social media, e-commerce, augmented reality, and artificial intelligence—we will examine how our relationships with our patients are changing, and more rapidly than we may realize, as a result of the speed of the changes happening in tech and society. These are just four implications of how advances in technology have changed our society, our patients, and consequently, our practices.

  1. Information exchange has accelerated at an uneven pace, which has led to

  2. Problems meeting needs and expectations which has contributed to the need to form

  3. Connected communities of patients who have both equalized and imbalanced

  4. Competitive advantages and disadvantages between large and small fertility practice groups.

And it’s only the beginning.

1). INformation EXCHAnge: Patients need more than providers can give

Travel back with me to the mid 1990’s. While today’s REI Fellows ran home from grade school to watch the latest episode of Saved By the Bell, the second generation of fertility sub-specialists left the universities to open their own fertility practices or start REI divisions at the hospitals. We’re referring to those who came after the pioneer generation of Howard Jones and Patrick Steptoe. Really, this class of baby-boomer REIs is the first generation of the fertility care provider whom we know today.

Now let’s imagine a couple from the same time period. They’ve been unable to conceive after two years of trying. How would they have found information on their

  • Diagnosis
    They could go to the bookstore. There was likely a book or two that offered good introductory information on infertility and/or how to get pregnant. But how is one supposed to keep a best selling thriller like The Fastest Way to Get Pregnant Naturally by Christopher D. Williams, MD on the shelves for long? Maybe there was a seminar in their area. But how would they have found out about it?

  • Support How would someone struggling with infertility have found professional or peer support? Could they just ask around town? RESOLVE was around, but it's not as though one could look them up in the yellow pages.

  • Treatment How did patients find their fertility provider? Would we have to hope that their OB/GYN or primary provider knew enough about emerging fertility care to direct them to the new sub-specialists in their area?

Think about the most powerful man in the world at that time, U.S. President, Bill Clinton. One of the most powerful supercomputers to which he had access was the Intel Paragon XP/140. Today, every one of your patients walks around with a supercomputer more powerful than that in their pocket. Because of that, our patients have access to more information than each of the world leaders from that time period as well. Information asymmetry is over, and it didn’t take long for these supercomputers to conquer our social habits.

The adoption of smart phones more than doubled from mid 2011 to late 2017 from 35% to 77%. 92% of adults ages 18-49 own a smartphone. You went to work one day and most of your patients did not have all of the world’s information at their fingertips. You came back to the same office six years later, and they did. The exchange of information has changed, but patients have outpaced their practices in their means to deliver and receive information, and that poses a problem in meeting patient expectations.

2). unable to meet patient expectation: not speaking the same language

“Not to use social media platforms is to be culturally incompetent. As a physician, we are supposed to give medical advice in a language the patient understands. Not doing so is considered to be medically inappropriate and can lead to adverse outcomes. If large segments of the population get the majority of their information digitally, isn’t it incumbent upon healthcare providers to provide information in an accessible, understandable way?”-Dr. Serena H. Chen, MD, REI

On a webinar that I conducted in August 2018, the most common challenge reported by fertility practice owners and managers was increasingly high patient expectations. Because patients have adopted the new methods of information exchange much more quickly, communication needs are frequently not met. This imbalance can negatively impact a fertility center’s relationship with its patients.

Patients are reaching out to practices through Facebook Messenger and Instagram at a quickly increasing rate. Patients spend most of their communication time on these channels, yet some practices don’t even have a contact form on their website. For younger patients, this is the equivalent of not having a telephone. On an average day, almost 40% of millenials interact with their smartphone more than anything or anyone else, including their significant other, according to 2016 research from Bank of America.

Practices are reporting challenges with meeting patient expectations, partly because technology has raised expectations of response time to a standard that staff cannot meet. Even if the expectations are unfair or unrealistic, fertility clinics are unable to reset those expectations if they are unable to effectively exchange information in balance.

  • Phone Calls
    Today's patients reluctantly call you to schedule an appointment. Tomorrow's patients simply won’t. Every year, the idea of making a phone call to schedule a new patient appointment is all the more foreign. When they are consumers, patients are accustomed to instant transactions, as with transportation, hotels, entertainment, and food. A survey from the United Kingdom found that more than 25% of smartphone owners never use their phone to make a call, up from only 4% 3 years prior.

  • Text Messaging
    Pew also states that Americans made over 12 phone calls a day in 2011. In 2015, however, a report by Informate shows that Americans make or answer only 6 phone calls a day, while sending and receiving 32 texts and spending 14 minutes on Chat. By the time institutes like Pew can even report their conclusions, the changes have already accelerated. 

  • Chatbots
    69% of consumers prefer interaction with chatbots for quick answers. Our prospective and current patients want (and expect) answers faster than we can respond to them. Think of the twenty most frequently asked questions that your front office staff has to answer over and over. They may even be answered as FAQs on your website. People expect these answers immediately, and the technology exists to meet that speed. See the example chabot flow below that can be used for your Facebook Messenger or website chat.

The future of chatbots for fertility centers

The future of chatbots for fertility centers

The data suggest that clinics are unable to set and reset expectations with patients because the information exchange is imbalanced in such way that is insufficient to the patient. If patients and centers are not communicating in the same media, they are not speaking the same language. Consider this data point from the same Bank of America study: “the majority (67 percent) of Americans feel the appropriate response time to a text is under an hour, with 43 percent citing under 10 minutes and 10 percent thinking it should be instantly”. Contrast this with how long it takes your already work-loaded staff to respond to patients who are anxiously awaiting their test results. So they turn to each other.

3). COnnected communities of patients…and a chance to lead them

With the information exchange so out of balance, how are patients meant to process their information overload? Technologist Alex Kouts argues that reasoning by proxy, is the reliance on other people or organizations to offload one’s cognitive load, for forming a conclusion on complex subjects. Many patients rely on the experiences and opinions of their peers to help them process the very complex information they receive about infertility.

Part of the reason behind a massive social behavior change in our patient population is that people are now starting to talk about infertility. In the past, how could patients have connected with others to talk about their experience with infertility? Today, many people still struggle with infertility in silence, but hundreds of thousands of people worldwide are changing that.

#TTC stands for “trying to conceive” on social media. As of July 2018, the infertility hashtag had been used over 580,000 times and the #ttcsisters hashtag has been used almost 330,300 times on Instagram. There are thousands of infertility support groups and pages on Facebook, hundreds of infertility blogs, and dozens of podcasts about fertility. 

The cat is out of the bag. Good!

If we want to encourage people who are struggling with infertility to pursue medical advice, then we want them to talk. People are now talking publicly about a very pressing problem which you are more qualified to address than virtually anyone in their area. By becoming the voice for people with infertility in your area, and the forum for which they can connect with information and support, we create a natural and honest referral system. To the extent that you can encourage this system by truly providing values to prospective patients, you will never want for new patients.

Smaller fertility practices have access to a word-of-mouth referral network that was never previously available to them. In Part 3 of this blog series, we discussed the major advantages that large, private equity backed practice groups have over independent fertility centers. Thankfully, large practice groups aren't so much better equipped to adapt to these changing habits as we are.

4). COMPETitive advantages and disadvantages: rigged game or level playing field?

Many patients don’t see a fertility specialist when they need to because they are scared and they have no idea what seeing a fertility doctor will be like. They don’t know who to trust, but they do trust their friends and relatives. In years past, most people would not have known that their cousin, co-worker, or college roommate struggled through many of the same problems which they currently face, much less that they saw a fertility specialist, whom, and how happy they were with him or her. Now, hundreds of people in a person's social network can see when they post a picture of their beautiful family to their fertility center's social media channels, and publicly thank their fertility doctor and care team.

Larger practice groups often spend more money on social media advertising, yes, that is true. Because of that they are taking patients from practices who are not active on social media. But those practices that constantly create content and engage their community are acquiring new patients by word-of-mouth faster than ever. In fact, some practices don't need to spend any money at all on social media advertising, because there organic reach is so high. If dozens to hundreds of patients refer your practice in a given month and help persuade strangers who are looking for social proof, you will never want for new patients again.

Large corporations can outspend your marketing budget. They will and they are. They can create referral programs for large OB/GYN groups. They can leverage better deals with insurance companies. But there is a kink in their armor: they have to keep up with patients' attention as much as you do. People struggling with infertility want to give you their attention. Many times, they think about nothing other than their problem and you have at least part of the solution. If you make the effort to build trust with them and help them where they spend the most attention, you can reach them in such a way that large competitors cannot.

The tech revolution and reproductive health

The tech revolution and reproductive health

ONLY the beginning

We are only at the very beginning of this technological revolution, which is greater than that of Johann Guttenberg and the printing press. Marketing for fertility clinics is only one facet of how consumer technology has changed reproductive health. Companies and products are invented every day that can change our field forever. Consider these breakthroughs and their potential ramifications in our field.

Think of AI in the IVF lab

Think of AI in the IVF lab

Artificial Intelligence

Error rates for image labeling have fallen from 28.5% to below 2.5% since 2010. On this specific test, AI is now more accurate than human performance. Imagine artificial intelligence being used to

  • Score embyro quality

  • Predict success of recommended prognosis

  • Real time diagnosis

virtual reality impact on Assisted Reproductive Technology

Virtual and Augmented Reality

Statista estimates that there are 171 million active users of augmented reality in 2018. A 2016 poll of consumers in the United States by ClickZ found that more than a third (37%) have now used either their own or someone else’s VR headset. In the not distant future, VR and AR may be used to

  • Provide initial consults

  • Tour the practice and IVF lab

  • Take CME lectures and courses

How will block chain affect Assisted Reproductive Technology?

Blockchain

Blockchain technology scopes far beyond the function of currency. Blockchain is the digitized, decentralized, public ledger of transactions of virtually any kind. The number of Blockchain wallets has been growing since the creation of the Bitcoin virtual currency in 2009, reaching over 25 million Blockchain wallet users at the end of June 2018. Accenture estimates that 30% of operating costs could be eliminated using Blockchain. Blockchain development is still in its very early life, but it could be used in reproductive health to

  • Replace electronic medical records

  • Finance treatment

  • Integrate systems such as billing, records, results, and treatment protocol

change is here

Whether we like it or not, the REI practice of 2019 can no longer be designed as a small medical clinic. Whether its motives are profit driven or in service to the betterment of humanity, or anywhere along that spectrum, it is an entrepreneurial venture. We’ve examined how the world has changed dynamically in the last two decades and will change even more in the next two. To succeed, fertility centers need to be structured as an entity that is led by a visionary, with a strategy and vision that account for powerful competitors and the ability to adapt as quickly to social and technological changes as quickly as our patients do.

The variables for which we need to account are infinite if we try to keep pace with our society’s technological revolution as a whole. If we manage to keep pace with our patients, however, we have access to a breadth of opportunity the likes of which the world has never seen.


 

 

7 trigger points that infuriate fertility patients and lead to bad reviews for doctors

By Griffin Jones

What should fertility doctors say or not say, do or not do, to avoid angry reactions from patients on the internet?

observation, not advice

This is tricky. I can help practices increase their positive reviews, but I will not tell physicians how they should talk to their patients, because I am not a physician. I write prescriptions only to medicine I’ve swallowed myself. The reason I feel comfortable telling clinics to invest in Facebook ads, is because I have had success reaching new patients through Facebook ads. I’m comfortable telling fertility specialists how to respond to negative reviews online because I have improved doctors’ online reputations from the way I respond to reviewers.

I have never delivered a fertility diagnosis inside a consult room. I’ve never told a couple that their prospective IVF cycle has a 10% chance of success or called someone to tell them that their 3rd IUI was not successful. I have an idea of how I think I would communicate with patients, but I have little tolerance for arm chair quarterbacks. 

navigating the mine field with compassion

Frank-Luntz-Quote-It-s-not-what-you-say-it-s-what-people-hear.jpg

What I can show you, however, are patterns that I’ve observed from upset patients: what I call “landmines” or “trigger points”. These are common themes that, when received a certain way, tend to send patients’ thumbs into a blaze of fury to light up their IVF center on the internet. By being aware of how patients recount certain interactions, you may better prepare for them.

“It’s not what we say, it’s what people hear.”—Frank Luntz, PhD

1). Body Mass Index
When a patient visits an IVF center, her initial testing may reveal that her body mass index (BMI) is too high for a fair probability of IVF success. Patients may first be referred elsewhere to help decrease their BMI. While I cannot tell you how to deliver this news, I can show you how it is sometimes received. Comments like, “he called me fat” or “they refused to even see me because I’m too fat,” are common on social media and review sites. I wouldn’t suppose that the physician used those words, but in a very difficult moment, this is what the patient may hear. 

fertility doctor called me fat.jpg

2). Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve
“She told me I was too old to ever get pregnant”. The quality or quantity of a patient’s eggs may be low, and a physician may issue caution about the probability of successful treatment. What could be a very honest move, certainly in patients’ best interest that they not spend money and energy on unwise surgery, can send patients to their keyboards in anger when received the wrong way.

fertility doctor said i was too old.jpg

3). Low probability diagnoses
Patients occasionally feel that their doctor is rooting against them, or shows no compassion for them when going over their diagnosis. Reviews commonly include boasting that the patient got pregnant, even though their doctor said they would not. This article articulates what patients sometimes write about their doctor after they have seen more than one specialist. 

4). Contact availability
“The two week wait” (#2ww) is one of the most notorious chapters of fertility treatment and it is only one of many anxious periods patients have to face. When one doesn't receive a call when she or he was told to expect one, more stress is added to the patient experience.  Failing to call with test results, not responding quickly enough to patient calls or e-mails, and not being available via the media which patients use to communicate are all landmines for patient reaction.

In fact, I would be very curious to know what percentage of negative fertility center reviews come during moments when the patient is waiting for correspondence from the provider. When worries about treatment monopolize a person's mental bandwidth, the wait for answers turns seconds into hours. It is a feeling of helplessness and desperation in which lashing out against the provider online may be an attempt to regain a sense of control.

5). Face time with doctor
Smaller fertility practices frequently claim that individualized care is their edge over larger practice groups. It is an advantage, if in fact, the patient gets to spend more time with the provider. Rarely seeing one’s physician is a very common pain point that leads patients to say things like “baby factory”, “only in it for the money”, and “looked at me as a dollar sign”.

Face time.jpg

6). Punctuality and preparation
Doctors are very busy people. So are patients. With high demand from patients, and a nearly infinite number of scenarios that can arise at any moment, the need for providers to maximize their time can make timeliness impractical. Still, patients feel slighted when they are not seen on time because their time is valuable too. The same goes for when they feel the doctor has not read their chart, not taken the time to thoroughly answer their questions, or rushes through their appointment. 

fertility doctor in it for the Money.jpg

7). Absolutely anything to do with billing
If these scenarios are landmines for fertility center reviews, the billing department is a minefield in and of itself. Billing issues might account for 1/3 to ½ of your negative reviews. In short, the billing department is arguably the greatest liability to a fertility practice’s online reputation. Patients often feel ambushed by the costs that they incur during the course of treatment. Insurance coverage (or lack thereof), reimbursements, deductible requirements, and variability in medication costs are pain-points unique to healthcare. Patients may lash out against their practice in a public forum because they do not experience these annoyances in most other consumer categories.

Hate the billing dept of fertility clinic.jpg

To make matters worse, prospective patients receive very little education about IVF costs prior to treatment. In fact, some practices refuse to detail any cost information on their websites because they are afraid that it will dissuade people in need from seeking a consultation or that it will give a competitive advantage to other IVF centers. Many fertility clinics would rather bury their heads in the sand and hope for the best, than properly use digital media to educate patients about the headaches of insurance and billing.

Setting the stage

As a fertility specialist, you are walking into a minefield of patient anxiety and frustration. I don’t think it would be possible to tip-toe around every possible pressure point. Instead, what may be more prudent, is to disarm the tension as much as possible from the very beginning. Of course, I can’t tell you what to say to patients. From what I observe from their accounts, however, is that many patients do not hear their concerns addressed in this way:

“What you are going through is extremely difficult at times, and that is perfectly normal. You’re not alone because we’re here to help you with everything we can and connect you with resources for those things we can't control. We wish we could wave a magic wand and make everything better right now, but there will likely be parts of this process that are very frustrating.

"Billing, medication costs, and insurance can be a big headache. You may see a charge for a service and think what the heck is this? Just ask, we're here to help you through it.

"There may be times when we don’t call you back as quickly as we want to because our nurses are helping other patients in the same way we want to help you.

"We always try to be on time for our appointments, but every now and again, a patient needs a little extra time with her doctor, and we want to extend that same level of care to you.

"We often have to be the bearers of very delicate news. We balance optimism and our eagerness to help you have a healthy, beautiful baby with our duty to inform you of the implications and realistic outcomes of your different options.

"You don't have it easy and neither do we, but the plus side is that we’re working together. We hope you’ll tell us if we are falling short at all during this process because we need your help to do our best for you".

Satisfaction equals experience minus expectation

By setting expectations abundantly clear ahead of time, you may be able to prevent negative reactions when, not if, issues arise. Some patients develop their own expectations, regardless of what you do to help set them. It’s okay if some people are not satisfied with your practice and staff as long as the dissatisfied number is the lowest it can be. There are certain pressure points that must be approached with empathy during the already tense fertility journey. By setting the stage and disarming the mine field, you can reduce the number of complaints about your practice and doctors, and increase patient satisfaction.

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If it's too late and you need examples on how to respond to negative reviews, read chapter 4 of the Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing

Flipping People's Peanuts at MRSi 2017: Everything is changing, and it's just the beginning

By Griffin Jones
 

This is my third annual recap of the Midwest Reproductive Symposium international (MRSi) , so I'm going to have a little fun with this one. I don't feel like writing another list and I think there's a more valuable point I can convey to you. As of right now, MRSi holds the title for my favorite meeting in the field of reproductive health and I want to use it nudge other meetings to follow suit. I should be a fair judge, I go to almost all of them.

It certainly doesn't hurt that it's on Lake Michigan in Chicago in the summer time, and Dr. Angeline Beltsos knows how to incorporate an interesting theme. Those are pluses, but not enough to make a meeting my favorite. It's big enough to have a diverse range of programming and small enough to be very collaborative and social. People get to know each other and build meaningful relationships. I truly understand how important that is for the field. Louise Brown, the first baby ever born from IVF was a guest at the conference. As Louise put it,

"My parents were willing to advance science and try something that had never been done before because they felt their doctors were truly there for them."

These reasons not withstanding, do you know what I really think MRSi holds over our other meetings in the field? It's the most forward-looking.

Other meetings sometimes do a great job of exploring the latest science and the future prospects for assisted reproductive technologies, but they often stop there. I believe that's a mistake. Compared to some of the technologies that are being developed both inside and outside of our field right now, PGS looks about as complicated as tying a shoe.

A Change Gonna Come. Oh wait. It already did.

Several presentations detailed the incredible growth of technology across multiple facets of society, not just ART. My own talk was titled The Biggest Change Ever in Human Communication: the Tech Revolution and Our Patients. The title isn't hyperbole. I made the case that we are living through a bigger shift than that of the printing press, perhaps even greater than the written word itself. If you would like the slides from my presentation, I will be happy to e-mail them to you. Here's the punchline: the supercomputer in every one's hand, that we call a smartphone, has changed dating, parenting, conversation, and commerce, for us and our patients. We have hardly begun to adapt our operations accordingly. And this is only the beginning.

Bob Huff, Chief Information Officer of RMA of Texas, shared with us technology that is changing the way generalists refer patients, and even the way patients are diagnosed. Scientists have just created functioning mouse embryos through 3D printing

My co-speaker, Hannah Johnson, Operations Director of Vios Fertility, and I, had the pleasure to speak to the mental health professionals group as well as the practice administrators' Business Minds group. We desperately need more of this inter-disciplinary kind of discussion because entire industries are being radically and forcibly changed. You'll forgive me for not using the popular buzzword, "disrupted". I prefer to put it more bluntly. Large institutions and established companies are losing double digit market share or going out of business in periods of 12-36 months. How does that sound?

"We could be looking at widespread clinic closures within the next 5-10 years."--Hannah johnson

I don't want that for this field. I started my career in radio advertising. I watched wealthy and powerful stakeholders go bankrupt because they were comfortable or because they weren't willing to invest time, money, and energy to adapt. As Dr. Francisco Arredondo from RMA of Texas says, "we produce one new fertility specialist per 10 million people per year". A need of such titanic portions is one that is begging for more technological disruption.

how can we learn if every effort is required to produce a particular result?

Broad social and technological change isn't a frame of mind that we usually allow ourselves to explore at most of our regional meetings throughout the year, or even at ASRM. It's a bit more welcome at MRS to question the status quo, and test new platforms and processes, without the scrutiny of the exact result that any particular effort might produce at the given moment. Elizabeth Carr, the first baby born from IVF in the United States, is now a marketing data consultant who also spoke at the conference. "I wouldn't be standing before you today if my parents and their doctors weren't willing to try something that had never been done before."

Virtually every area of medicine and practice management is ready to be disrupted by technology. We can wait for pain, or we can put in the effort and patience required to adapt to these changes. MRSi is the first meeting in our field where we're starting to think and talk in these terms. I hope it serves as an example for the others.