fertility marketing

The Battle for the IVF Market: 5 Wall Street backed companies vs. private practice

By Griffin Jones

In Venture Capital fertilization

Part 3 of a four part series on the main business challenges facing fertility centers because of the shift from "small clinic" to "entrepreneurial endeavor"

Multi-million dollar private equity firms offer fertility practices an ultimatum: sell part of their practice, or have their market-share siphoned away.

Major firms spend hundreds of millions of dollars nationwide because they are in a race to consolidate as much of the fragmented IVF market as they can. This is only to speak of companies who own and operate networks of fertility clinics. In parallel, in 2017, PitchBook tallied more than $178 million invested into startups developing fertility products. In our series about fertility practices’ tectonic shift from small clinic to entrepreneurial venture, we’ve detailed the challenges that independent fertility practices face that their big new competitors don’t. So who are these new titans, and what are they up to?

Merger and acquisition pattern of fertility centers

Merger and acquisition pattern of fertility centers

Important disclaimer: Neither I, nor Fertility Bridge have a direct commercial relationship with these companies at time of writing, though we certainly may in the future. We work or have worked with clinics in some of their networks. This profile is not a revelation of insider knowledge. Rather, it is a curated synopsis of public information. My observations and opinions are exactly those, based on information that has been publicly released by these companies or covered in the press.

compete with or join them. just don't pretend they don't exist

deciding to sell fertility practice

I have good friends that work for these companies or have affiliated their practices with them. Some might be very happy with their corporate partners and some might not be. It could be an excellent decision for your practice to sell equity to one of these firms or engage in a different level of strategic partnership with them. For some practice owners, a relationship with one of these firms is the answer to a lot of headaches. The stress of operations is shared with someone else, so providers can focus on practicing medicine.

Other practice principals feel they would lose control over the way they treat patients. They have their own vision for their culture and operations. If you’ve been struggling with this decision, I suggest reading part 2 of our series on vision and strategy, to see where you stand. This might be a long conversation, or several, with your business partner, spouse, clergyman, or bartender. You have to make the decision that’s right for you, your family, and your practice. There’s no right or wrong answer in a vacuum. Whether you decide to fight ‘em or join ‘em, however, we just can’t pretend these major new players don’t exist.

Second important disclaimer: It can be very fashionable to say these companies are more interested in their quarterly profits than the best interest of the patient. There may be cases when business pressures affect personal care. But I would be just as quick to point out that these companies might better serve patients in certain areas because they are better suited to face the challenges that we talked about throughtout this series. Their bankrolls may come from Wall Street, but the people that I know that work for these fertility networks are just as passionate about serving patients as those in private practice. Nevertheless, neither you, nor I, nor they get to pass final judgement on the quality of their output. The patient market decides.

The (Relatively) New Kids on the block

If we covered all newer companies in non-direct competition with fertility practices, this blog post would be longer than Don Quixote. In this article, we profile those networks who directly compete with other fertility centers. We also learn about the private equity firms behind them. Once again we ask ourselves, what is the plan?

Now let’s meet the people who want to buy you out or blow you over.

1). PRELUDE FERTILITY

Fertility acquisition strategy

Fertility acquisition strategy

Prelude Fertility splashed into reproductive headlines in the fall of 2016 when Forbes magazine reported on The 200 Million Dollar Startup That Wants to Stop the Biological Clock. Where does a startup get $200 million and how have they acquired market-share so quickly? Meet the war chest and strategic acquisitions behind Prelude’s rapid market entry.

  • Lee Equity Partners. If Prelude’s coffers total $200 million, and Lee Equity’s buy-in was in line with their disclosed portfolio, then one might speculate that 25 to 50% of Prelude’s initial funding came from Lee Equity Partners. Massive capital from Lee Equity Partners has allowed Prelude to accelerate their acquisition of existing companies, and have they ever.
     
  • RBA. In October 2016, Prelude reported that it had acquired Reproductive Biology Associates (RBA) of Atlanta. RBA is the largest IVF practice group in the state of Georgia. Perhaps more importantly, RBA came with their sister company, My Egg Bank.
     
  • MyEggBank was created by RBA in 2010. According to their corporate timeline, their affiliate network grew from 22 clinics in 2012 to 109 in 2017. They report that over 4,400 babies have been born from MyEggBank donor eggs.
     
  • Vivere Health. Why buy one IVF lab at a time when you could acquire several at once? In a parallel running story, Prelude reported acquiring Vivere Health in October 2017. Vivere Health, LLC was founded in 2010 in partnership with Houston Fertility Institute. After an impressive acquisition journey of its own, Vivere Health had owned and operated IVF clinics and labs in
    • Austin
    • Dallas
    • Houston
    • New Orleans
    • Florida
    • Arizona
    • Kentucky

In April 2016, Vivere was listed in Fortune Magazine as one of the fastest growing female-owned companies in the United States.

Prelude says that their strategic goal is national scale. With a few more acquisitions of this pattern and magnitude, they will have achieved that end.

2). IVI RMA Global

If you’re less familiar with European originated IVI , Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA) might ring a bell.

  • IVI was founded in Valencia, Spain in 1990. They own subsidiaries in genetic testing, IVF lab consulting, research and development, and stem sell banking, to name a few. In 2016, IVI owned and operated 60 clinic locations in 11 countries and treated over 60,000 patients.
     
  • Nova IVI. Major fertility networks aren’t relegated to the United States. They come from all over the globe and their expansion is international. In April 2012, IVI acquired Nova Pulse IVF and now owns and operates one of the largest fertility networks in India. Nova IVI reports over 19,000 IVF pregnancies in India alone.
     
  • RMA. According to their own PR announcement, RMA of New Jersey grew 70% in new patient volume from 2012 to 2017. I am unclear on RMA of New Jersey’s exact relationship with other RMA network clinics in the United States. Clinics under the RMA name operate in
    • New Jersey
    • New York
    • Pennsylvania
    • Florida
    • Connecticut
    • Michigan
    • Texas
    • Florida

In February 2017, IVI announced that their merger with RMA of New Jersey would make them the largest fertility network in the world. In a horridly translated press release, IVI reports that they own 70% of the new company while RMA of New Jersey owns 30%. They mention their combined 2,400 employees, including 200 physicians and 300 research scientists across 70 clinics in 13 countries.

3). INTEGRAMED

Integramed Fertility’s model is different from many fertility networks. Private equity is only one of three relationship models for Integramed. They also sell services for marketing and practice management that do not involve taking equity in the practice.

  • Integramed Fertility is a division of Integramed America and they report to be the largest fertility network in North America. With 2,200 employees and affiliate employees, the network is comprised of 39 centers at 153 locations across 32 states and the District of Columbia.
     
  • Attain Fertility. Integramed owns Attain Fertility, a patient-facing IVF finance program. They offer multi cycle programs, multi cycle programs with refunds, and bundling with additional services such as PGS and third party services. Subsequently, Attain functions as a lead generation company. Patients can search for Attain Fertility member clinics by doctor or by geographic area and Attain funnels those new patient leads to the clinic. Their business model is similar to that of ARC Fertility.
     
  • Sagard Holdings. Similar to how Prelude Fertility acquires practices through the funding of Lee Equity Partners, Integramed’s capital comes from Sagard Holdings. Integramed had been a publicly traded company, but Sagard reportedly took them off of the Stock Market in 2012 for just under $170 million.

4). OVATION FERTILITY

Ovation Fertility was founded in 2015 by physicians at Texas Fertility Center after a “major private equity investment to form a national network of assisted reproductive technology (ART) labratories”. At time of writing, Ovation Fertility owns and operates six IVF labs in five U.S. states.

  • California
  • Texas
  • Louisiana
  • Nevada
  • Tennessee

The private equity manager behind Ovation's capital is MTS Health Services.

May meritocracy win all in the competition for best serving the patient population.

May meritocracy win all in the competition for best serving the patient population.

5). CCRM

The Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine, CCRM as you fondly know them, enters new markets by acquisition like everyone else. Perhaps more than the other groups, however, CCRM enters new market areas through De Novo clinics. This means they help develop new labs and clinics in strong markets. In recent years, CCRM has opened or acquired IVF labs and practices in

  • Atlanta
  • Boston
  • Houston
  • Minneapolis
  • New York
  • Northern Virginia
  • Southern California
  • San Francisco Bay Area
  • Toronto

CCRM markets their lab advantages in every one of their markets. Since 2015, the private equity behind CCRM’s expansion comes at least partly from TA Associates in Boston. TA reports having raised over $18 billion in capital across their portfolio.

HONORABLE MENTION

In this article, we’ve only talked about your direct competitors. There are more companies from China and elsewhere that are buying fertility practices at high multiples that I don’t know very much about. There are large practice groups without private equity that acquire other clinics into their group. We didn’t even mention the new competitors that siphon market-share by offering new solutions or focusing on particular services. Here are just a few:

You don’t need to find Indiana and Arizona on a map to see that Boston IVF has interest in expanding beyond the northeast. Boston IVF is the “preferred provider of fertility services” for 15 different major health insurance plans. Boston IVF is the clinical affiliate of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School REI fellowship program. How would you like that advantage for recruiting new physicians? If there is a private equity firm associated with Boston IVF, I didn’t find it.

WHAT DOES IT all MEAN FOR YOU?

What’s a good ol' independently owned fertility practice group to do? Is there an opportunity for you to compete and thrive in this radically different world? You might look at regional banks or craft breweries. A century ago, every city in North America boasted their own local brewery, likely several. Beer became commoditized, and the corporations with the best distribution, market share, and financial leverage acquired or vanquished their competitors. By the 1990s, we were left with Anheuser-Busch, Miller, and Coors. South African Breweries  purchased Miller  and Molson-Coors (another merged mega conglomerate) in 2008 to become SABMiller-Coors, and finally merged with Anheuser-Busch/InBev (another merged mega conglomerate) in 2016 .

The past twenty years should have been a terrible period to start a brewery. Yet, quite to the contrary, independent breweries opened all over the country and took marketshare from the big players, now at 23% . Middle market companies like Sam Adams and Yuengling grew their own sales and grew by acquiring small breweries. The cycle continues. We see the same pattern among regional banks, and I believe we are seeing it in our field as well.

Small practices join together to become mid-size practices, and large companies acquire both small and mid-size groups. Then, physicians leave big practice groups and academic institutions to start the cycle anew. (I’ve got my eye on you, Vios Fertility). I don’t believe that all independent practices will be acquired or wiped out. The current and coming landscapes are just exceedingly difficult for unintentional REI entrepreneurs.

if you can't beat 'em, join 'em

when fertility centers join big practice groups

What will happen if you're unprepared for these competitors when the next economic recession starts? What will you do if 30-40% of the money in the marketplace goes away, seemingly over night? What would that do to your IVF volume? To your new patient visits?

Entrepreneurial competition isn't the only answer. It might make sense to sell equity in your practice or control of your lab. It could be the answer to a lot of your problems. One of the companies profiled in this article might be a great fit for your office. If we want to sell our practice, and want to go into the negotiation with “strong upside”, plenty of options, and not as a “distressed asset”, what is the plan?

if you can't join 'em, beat 'em

Nick Foles superbowl.jpg

On the other hand, the idea of giving up control and direction of your practice might eat you alive. Only you can make that decision. By taking market-share from big competitors now, as opposed to letting them take ours, we can prepare for an economic downturn in which we will not only survive, but thrive. If we are going to defend and grow market share against majorly funded competitors, what is the plan? 

We’ll conclude our series on IVF centers’ tectonic shift from small healthcare practice to entrepreneurial venture with perhaps their greatest challenge of all. Yet, it’s also their greatest opportunity and their chance to beat their giant new competitors where they lag.

In Part 4, we discuss the biggest change ever to occur in human communication and technology.

The one that dwarfs the revolution of the printing press.

The one we're living through right now.

What is the plan?

Set Up to Fail: Fertility Clinics Not Structured for 2018

By Griffin Jones

Part 1 of a four part series on the main business challenges facing fertility centers because of the shift from "small clinic" to "entrepreneurial endeavor"

“Young doctors aren’t willing to work long hours,”

“Fellows today don’t have entrepreneurial chops,”

“New REIs don’t want to pay their dues.”

Millennial fertility doctors may sometimes be perceived this way

Millennial fertility doctors may sometimes be perceived this way

Have you ever made any of these comments or heard them said about your peers? It’s common to razz new subspecialists coming out of their Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) fellowship. I often hear from recruiting physicians, that new REIs are not entrepreneurial. That they have no desire to take over a retiring doctor’s fertility center and run their own practice. It is said that fellows and new specialists want to work for someone else, clock their hours, and go home.

There may be valid points in this general perspective, but I see a much more comprehensive picture. Would you like to see what I observe from my semi-outsider’s vantage point? The radical statement to follow is the thesis behind the core business challenges with which so many fertility centers battle today.

The Tectonic Shift from "SMALL CLINIC" to "ENTREPRENEURIAL ENDEAVOR"

I don’t believe that many practice owners wanted to be entrepreneurs either. I suppose many physicians wanted to run their own fertility center and practice medicine the way they prefer. Is that unfair? Twenty to twenty five years ago, that may have been a tenable position. At that time, fertility specialists opened and operated small medical practices. Today, whether they like it or not, independent practices are entrepreneurial enterprises. We have sailed away from our calm cottage lakes, and onto the ocean of commercial venture. Here, our competitive threats come not only from other fertility centers, but from Wall Street, Silicon Valley, and a dynamically changing society. Canadian and European friends, this includes you too.

In this series, we’ll identify the main threats and challenges that fertility doctors, now accidental entrepreneurs, face in this new, unforgiving landscape.

  • Practice Business Structure
  • Vision and Strategy
  • Fierce Competition
  • Rapidly Changing Technology and Society

And we will force ourselves to answer the question we can no longer afford to avoid:

What is the plan?

Part 1: PRACTICE BUSINESS STRUCTURE

Independent fertility centers’ competitive challenges begin long before we even begin to think about marketing. Typically, they are inherent to the structure of the practice. If you own an IVF center run by fourteen employees, it may be tempting to ignore corporate structure. On the contrary, it is lack of structure that frequently keeps small practices from competing with large firms. Here we see the first differences between an REI practice, and a commercial endeavor.

A fertility clinic is run by a

  • Medical Director
  • Practice Director
  • Lab Director
  • Practice Administrator

Who runs the large corporations that are buying and operating fertility clinics across North America? Did you know that your new competitors are led by a C-Suite? They have a

  • Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
  • Chief Operating Officer (COO)
  • Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)
  • Chief Technology Officer (CTO)
  • Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
  • Chief Information Officer (CIO)
  • Chief Human Resources Officer (CHRO)
Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS) Accountability Chart applied to fertility clinics

Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS) Accountability Chart applied to fertility clinics

This isn’t to suggest that a four physician, twenty five employee IVF clinic needs to have the same corporate structure as their large competitors. They don’t. They need to run their company on a business operating system (BOS) if they want to articulate a vision, agree upon a strategy, and enable their entire team to achieve their collective goals. Fertility Bridge is run on an operating system called the Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS). To clarify, I am not an EOS consultant, nor do I sell their services at this time. You can find another BOS or you can build your own, though I have no idea why anyone would want to start from scratch.

One of the strongest arguments of EOS is that there are three core functions in any business. In our field, we might split Operations into Medical and Lab, or even Compliance, but the three core functions are

  • Operations
  • Finance
  • Sales and Marketing

In most independent IVF centers, instead of planning for the three core business functions for which someone must execute, they are often bundled into “other” and dropped in the lap of the practice administrator. Is she or he expected to run the operations of the practice, account for the finances, recruit and manage team members and write and execute a complete marketing plan? Is she or he an expert on digital media, law, technology, workforce development, and corporate strategy? Is that fair? Is that realistic?

How many seats are you in?

Rather than hire someone for each of these roles right away, which most fertility centers cannot do, EOS helps with the concept of “one person, one seat”. One person can hold more than one seat, but one seat cannot be occupied by more than one person. This helps small practices flush out capacity related issues and step out of roles as they grow.

Take a look at an example accountability chart below. How many seats are you in? How many seats are unclear as to who is accountable for them?

Example Accountability Chart for fertility clinics.png

As an REI physician, in just one very busy seat, you probably have to perform

  • 150+ egg retrievals,
  • Several dozen intrauterine inseminations (IUI),
  • All other surgeries

Oh, and you still have to spend time with and respond to your patients.

While infertility doctors at corporate-run clinics can devote all of their working time to their "REI seat", you’re the Medical Director or Practice Director of your IVF center and you have many other roles. As the head of an entrepreneurial venture, you now have additional responsibilities to properly delegate or do yourself.

  • Implement the vision of your company
  • Hire and interview every employee
  • Execute the marketing strategy
  • Account for the finances
  • Run the operations of the office
  • Manage every member of every team

Simply delegating each of these responsibilities can be a full time job, let alone sitting in each individual seat. Again, independent practices don’t necessarily need dozens of employees to run the business side. If they want to maintain or grow their practice, they need to eliminate, automate, and delegate. [A wink to those practice principals that are still signing paper checks].

Is "control" hindering your practice's growth?

Something stops fertility centers’ teams from taking ownership of each of these responsibilities and taking them off of the practice owner’s lap. As one writer says, “Want to drive your employees absolutely crazy? Give them responsibility without authority”.

If we hire a Human Resources Manager, but she doesn’t have the authority to choose the payroll company, negotiate salaries, or make the final decision on hires, then the responsibility of Human Resources continues to consume our time and energy.

If we hire a finance officer, but this person isn’t able to choose the bookkeeping software, set pay dates, and decide the terms of Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable, then we haven’t delegated finance.

If a practice hires a marketing director, but the marketing director doesn’t have creative control and isn’t given a budget and goals for which they are responsible, then the load of marketing remains in our lap.

How does it impact the growth of your practice if you and your partners deal in every facet of the business without clearly defined roles in an operating system? How does it affect the way you practice medicine? How does it weigh on your relationships with your patients, your team members, and your loved ones?

SHIFTING from "practice owner" to "visionary"

If this describes you or your partners, is it because you're reluctant to pass on control? When practice owners feel that that they need to manage every movement in the practice, it may be because there is not a cohesive culture behind a clear vision. By acknowledging the tectonic shift that has happened in the field of reproductive health, that independent fertility practices are in fact commercial enterprises, practice principals can step into the role of visionary. In the next part of our series on the difference between fertility practices and entrepreneurial ventures, we’ll see when a company follows an operating system, practice principals are able to chart a vision and plan that allows them to pass responsibility to their team and adapt their practices to our changing world.

7 trigger points that infuriate fertility patients and lead to bad reviews for doctors

By Griffin Jones

What should fertility doctors say or not say, do or not do, to avoid angry reactions from patients on the internet?

observation, not advice

This is tricky. I can help practices increase their positive reviews, but I will not tell physicians how they should talk to their patients, because I am not a physician. I write prescriptions only to medicine I’ve swallowed myself. The reason I feel comfortable telling clinics to invest in Facebook ads, is because I have had success reaching new patients through Facebook ads. I’m comfortable telling fertility specialists how to respond to negative reviews online because I have improved doctors’ online reputations from the way I respond to reviewers.

I have never delivered a fertility diagnosis inside a consult room. I’ve never told a couple that their prospective IVF cycle has a 10% chance of success or called someone to tell them that their 3rd IUI was not successful. I have an idea of how I think I would communicate with patients, but I have little tolerance for arm chair quarterbacks. 

navigating the mine field with compassion

Frank-Luntz-Quote-It-s-not-what-you-say-it-s-what-people-hear.jpg

What I can show you, however, are patterns that I’ve observed from upset patients: what I call “landmines” or “trigger points”. These are common themes that, when received a certain way, tend to send patients’ thumbs into a blaze of fury to light up their IVF center on the internet. By being aware of how patients recount certain interactions, you may better prepare for them.

“It’s not what we say, it’s what people hear.”—Frank Luntz, PhD

1). Body Mass Index
When a patient visits an IVF center, her initial testing may reveal that her body mass index (BMI) is too high for a fair probability of IVF success. Patients may first be referred elsewhere to help decrease their BMI. While I cannot tell you how to deliver this news, I can show you how it is sometimes received. Comments like, “he called me fat” or “they refused to even see me because I’m too fat,” are common on social media and review sites. I wouldn’t suppose that the physician used those words, but in a very difficult moment, this is what the patient may hear. 

fertility doctor called me fat.jpg

2). Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve
“She told me I was too old to ever get pregnant”. The quality or quantity of a patient’s eggs may be low, and a physician may issue caution about the probability of successful treatment. What could be a very honest move, certainly in patients’ best interest that they not spend money and energy on unwise surgery, can send patients to their keyboards in anger when received the wrong way.

fertility doctor said i was too old.jpg

3). Low probability diagnoses
Patients occasionally feel that their doctor is rooting against them, or shows no compassion for them when going over their diagnosis. Reviews commonly include boasting that the patient got pregnant, even though their doctor said they would not. This article articulates what patients sometimes write about their doctor after they have seen more than one specialist. 

4). Contact availability
“The two week wait” (#2ww) is one of the most notorious chapters of fertility treatment and it is only one of many anxious periods patients have to face. When one doesn't receive a call when she or he was told to expect one, more stress is added to the patient experience.  Failing to call with test results, not responding quickly enough to patient calls or e-mails, and not being available via the media which patients use to communicate are all landmines for patient reaction.

In fact, I would be very curious to know what percentage of negative fertility center reviews come during moments when the patient is waiting for correspondence from the provider. When worries about treatment monopolize a person's mental bandwidth, the wait for answers turns seconds into hours. It is a feeling of helplessness and desperation in which lashing out against the provider online may be an attempt to regain a sense of control.

5). Face time with doctor
Smaller fertility practices frequently claim that individualized care is their edge over larger practice groups. It is an advantage, if in fact, the patient gets to spend more time with the provider. Rarely seeing one’s physician is a very common pain point that leads patients to say things like “baby factory”, “only in it for the money”, and “looked at me as a dollar sign”.

Face time.jpg

6). Punctuality and preparation
Doctors are very busy people. So are patients. With high demand from patients, and a nearly infinite number of scenarios that can arise at any moment, the need for providers to maximize their time can make timeliness impractical. Still, patients feel slighted when they are not seen on time because their time is valuable too. The same goes for when they feel the doctor has not read their chart, not taken the time to thoroughly answer their questions, or rushes through their appointment. 

fertility doctor in it for the Money.jpg

7). Absolutely anything to do with billing
If these scenarios are landmines for fertility center reviews, the billing department is a minefield in and of itself. Billing issues might account for 1/3 to ½ of your negative reviews. In short, the billing department is arguably the greatest liability to a fertility practice’s online reputation. Patients often feel ambushed by the costs that they incur during the course of treatment. Insurance coverage (or lack thereof), reimbursements, deductible requirements, and variability in medication costs are pain-points unique to healthcare. Patients may lash out against their practice in a public forum because they do not experience these annoyances in most other consumer categories.

Hate the billing dept of fertility clinic.jpg

To make matters worse, prospective patients receive very little education about IVF costs prior to treatment. In fact, some practices refuse to detail any cost information on their websites because they are afraid that it will dissuade people in need from seeking a consultation or that it will give a competitive advantage to other IVF centers. Many fertility clinics would rather bury their heads in the sand and hope for the best, than properly use digital media to educate patients about the headaches of insurance and billing.

Setting the stage

As a fertility specialist, you are walking into a minefield of patient anxiety and frustration. I don’t think it would be possible to tip-toe around every possible pressure point. Instead, what may be more prudent, is to disarm the tension as much as possible from the very beginning. Of course, I can’t tell you what to say to patients. From what I observe from their accounts, however, is that many patients do not hear their concerns addressed in this way:

“What you are going through is extremely difficult at times, and that is perfectly normal. You’re not alone because we’re here to help you with everything we can and connect you with resources for those things we can't control. We wish we could wave a magic wand and make everything better right now, but there will likely be parts of this process that are very frustrating.

"Billing, medication costs, and insurance can be a big headache. You may see a charge for a service and think what the heck is this? Just ask, we're here to help you through it.

"There may be times when we don’t call you back as quickly as we want to because our nurses are helping other patients in the same way we want to help you.

"We always try to be on time for our appointments, but every now and again, a patient needs a little extra time with her doctor, and we want to extend that same level of care to you.

"We often have to be the bearers of very delicate news. We balance optimism and our eagerness to help you have a healthy, beautiful baby with our duty to inform you of the implications and realistic outcomes of your different options.

"You don't have it easy and neither do we, but the plus side is that we’re working together. We hope you’ll tell us if we are falling short at all during this process because we need your help to do our best for you".

Satisfaction equals experience minus expectation

By setting expectations abundantly clear ahead of time, you may be able to prevent negative reactions when, not if, issues arise. Some patients develop their own expectations, regardless of what you do to help set them. It’s okay if some people are not satisfied with your practice and staff as long as the dissatisfied number is the lowest it can be. There are certain pressure points that must be approached with empathy during the already tense fertility journey. By setting the stage and disarming the mine field, you can reduce the number of complaints about your practice and doctors, and increase patient satisfaction.

-----------

If it's too late and you need examples on how to respond to negative reviews, read chapter 4 of the Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing

A Stern Warning for Fertility Clinics Who Complain About Patient Review Sites

By Griffin Jones

"Change is not painful. resistance to change is painful."

Consider this a gentle "love tap" from a friend. 

A direct warning from me is far milder than what the market has in store. If I don't speak up about this single issue now, then I am neglectful in my duty to help protect the field of reproductive health from cultural and technological shock, because the internet-led market has proven to be unforgiving.

easy part.jpg

When I entered the fertility world, I accepted the responsibility of preparing those inside the field from the disruption coming from outside. I built a company to help bridge the gap between the status quo of reproductive health and what's happening in the rest of the tech revolution. So that we're not dealing with contemporary business buzzwords, allow me to give this definition to what entrepreneurs and venture capitalists call "disruption":

  • Major enterprises losing double-digit market share or going out of business within 36 months due to brand new players who come from outside of their field. 

ONline reputation is hardly the tip of the iceberg

This article does not come in reference to any one particular conversation I've had (perhaps even with you) in the last few months...because I've had several. Some have been with clients, some with vendors, some with strategic partners; it's a recurring theme.

When I first started creating content for fertility practices, the topic of "online reputation" is what really piqued the interest of fertility doctors. Many of us are concerned with what people say about us online. We often find the comments to be unfair, untrue, or at the very least, unkind. As we explore, however, you may agree that the root of the issue has less to do with the comments of others and more to do with a strategically flawed grasp for control.

Technological and cultural change are sweeping through nearly every facet of society. We are dissecting online reputation in this instance, simply because it happens to be a very common pain-point. In this deep-dive, we closely examine

  • The cause behind the information shift of the last twenty years
  • Why patients have embraced it
  • The four principal reasons that practices have NOT embraced it
  • Why patients rely on social proof to make decisions
  • The real threat to a fertility center's online reputation
  • What to do once we've stopped resisting 

Many doctors tell me that negative reviews upset them to the point where they can't sleep. You've done everything you could, and if you could wave a magic wand, you would wish for nothing less than for your upset patient to have a healthy baby and a happy family. Before we separate your perspective from the patient's right to have and share a completely different perspective, let's first examine the informational shift that has happened over the last two decades.

the human need to move away from information ASYMMETRY

For any patient to think that she or he is more qualified to review her or his case after a few hours (or even hundreds) of internet research, must be insulting. If you're a fertility doctor, you've gone through four years of undergraduate studies, four years of medical school, four years of residency, and three years of REI fellowship. That's fifteen years of higher education, followed by some of the most demanding board exams in medicine. If you've grown accustomed to this legacy of information control, it's because you've worked extremely hard to do so. 

Information asymmetry, wherein the seller (provider) almost always has an information advantage over the buyer (patient) is wonderful...when you're the seller. Recall other pre-internet situations in which you have been the buyer. Call back to a time when you had to buy a car when only the car dealer knew the manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) or its pre-owned history. Think of buying a house when only the realtor knew the last sale price, its home improvements, and recent sales in the neighborhood.  How did that feel? The best real estate agent in your market has a lot more experience buying and selling homes than you do. She may also be a very authentic and trustworthy professional. Does that mean she should expect you not to use Zillow and Trulia? You don't need me to explain the deep-seated human need to shift from information asymmetry to information parity. As consumers, we do it every day.

For over a century, virtually the only way for someone to obtain in-depth knowledge about any given medical condition was to attend medical school. Like our example of home-buying, patients had a scarcity of information, few provider choices, and no means to talk back. Contrast that with our very different world today.

The drive toward information parity

change coming for ivf centers

When I was a kid in the early 1990s, I wanted a million dollars so I could buy my own video game arcade. Now I have one on my phone (that I have never used). Every one of our patients walks around with a super computer in his or her pocket at all times. Within sixty seconds of being diagnosed with infertility, one can

  • Read various definitions of infertility
  • Study the most common causes
  • Research potential treatments
  • Compare providers
  • Watch video explanations from medical doctors from around the world
  • Find humor and relief from satirical and artistic content
  • Connect with thousands of other patients via social media

Information asymmetry is over. Forever.

patients often need to rely on each other 

Some of us are frustrated that just because our patients have access to virtually limitless information, that does not qualify them to make any diagnoses or prognoses. Correct; they are not medical doctors. They don't have to be. They are human beings with opinions and emotions and they have a right to share their experiences with each other. They frequently have to turn to one another for social proof to help them assess this information.

Also known as informational social influence, social proof is the psychological phenomenon where people rely on the actions and opinions of others to determine the appropriate behavior for a given situation. Talk about ambiguous social situations! What is the appropriate mode of behavior when someone learns that they've been diagnosed with infertility? When they've paid $18,000 of their life savings for two failed IVF cycles?

Social proof may be even more necessary for those dealing with infertility because of the tremendous social pressure to have children. When so few people in one's social network can relate to what they're going through, our patients frequently have to turn to the internet to find those who can empathize with their emotions and relate to their experience. 

information parity meets social proof meets technology

Imagine having to spend thousands of dollars of your own money on fertility treatment, and having no way of knowing which doctor or clinic could be the best fit for you. Along comes a fantastic user experience (UX), with sleek design and fields of search deeply relevant to those struggling with infertility. 

I don't own any equity in or have any commercial partnership with Fertility IQ at this time. Yet when I set myself free from my own desire to have perfect control over my paying clients' online ratings, and put myself in the position of the patient, it's easy to understand why they are using the platform in the hundreds of thousands. Instead of comparing apples to oranges on Google reviews, RateMDs, ZocDoc, Vitals, HealthGrades, or even Yelp, people with infertility read verified experiences from patients by their

  • Age
  • Diagnosis
  • Type of treatment(s)
  • Number of treatments
  • Success or failure of each treatment
  • Income level
  • Number of doctors seen

Complaining about Fertility IQ or any other review site is not as trivial as disliking a website. It's partaking in the exhausting struggle against what patients desperately seek. It is the hubris attempt to fight the human drive to move away from information asymmetry toward information parity. The market, whether through Facebook, Instagram, FIQ, Google, or any other platform will find a way to give it to them. It does not give a damn if we are inconvenienced.

the four main reasons for resisting patient reviews

Tech disruption in infertility field

I won't tell you to let go of control because we can't let go of something we don't have. If Muammar Gaddafi, the despot who antagonized western powers for decades, couldn't suppress social media, how could we? Why would we want to?

Well, after hundreds of conversations with fertility doctors, nurses, and practice managers, I've identified four principal reasons that we yearn to have control over what people say about us online, leading us down the path of most resistance.

  1. What we do is so hard and complicated. People don't have a right to criticize what they don't understand
    Consider the phenomenon of flight. What a magical experience. Distances that would have taken us weeks to travel a century ago, now take us a few hours. Instead of physical exertion, we're served snacks and alcohol while we enjoy unlimited entertainment on our personal supercomputers. The logistics, expertise, and technology required to provide this luxury to us are overwhelming.

    Left to my own devices, I would be lucky to mount a camel for a few miles. I still hate United Airlines, and so do you, and so do millions of our peers. Could we do a better job piloting, procuring maintenance for tens of thousands of aircraft, and maintaining schedules for tens of millions of travelers? Absolutely not. Should we have any right to complain when we're inconvenienced by what is still a tremendous luxury compared to the alternatives? Should is irrelevant; we do have the right, and we frequently exercise it. We are citizens of countries where free speech is (meant to be) protected by our constitutions. 

  2.  These reviews are fake
    Of the four reasons for resistance, this is the most legitimate, if the review is in fact illegitimate. False reviews are a real problem. Up to 15% of online reviews may be fake. If you are certain that a review is not from a patient at all, but from a competitor or an internet troll, flag it for review. I recommend flagging the review from more than one user account. At Fertility Bridge, we see fake reviews rear their ugly heads, and aren't always able to get them taken down. It's unfair and it pisses me off too. Because at least 85% of our reviews are authentic, let's focus on what we can control.

  3. Only unhappy people leave reviews
    A widely held assumption among fertility doctors is that IVF center reviews are overwhelmingly negative. This simply isn't true. In an analysis of 504 fertility clinic reviews, conducted by Fertility Bridge in 2015, 63% of reviews were positive and 37% were negative. Yes, there are reasons that people are motivated to leave negative and positive reviews about their practices. Someone may not have been able to become pregnant and want to take it out on you. Others may sing your praises because they were pregnant. Still, some centers are able to minimize their negative comments and maximize their positive ratings; that is our goal.

  4. Negative reviews use libel and slander
    If you'd like a good laugh with your morning coffee, read RateMDs' FAQs for doctors. In 12 paragraphs, they tell you how you can go pound sand if you think you're going to sue them. Vitals and HealthGrades do too, but RateMDs is the most humorous.
    Sometimes reviews violate the platform's terms of agreement by using hateful or vulgar language, and the site will remove them. Most of the time they do not.

the greatest threat to the accuracy of your reputation

Once we've moved beyond our four cardinal motives for resisting public feedback, we can focus on the real liability to the accuracy of our online reputations.

Last summer, in a summary of fertility doctors' responses to their online reviews, I corrected the old adage, "the customer is always right," to "the patients (plural, meaning the market) are always right". I'll use my own company as an example. Fertility Bridge served eight IVF clinics in 2016. If two of them were dissatisfied, one held a neutral opinion, and five were delighted with the service they received, I might be able to identify a few patterns. But what I would really want to do, is increase the volume of evaluation. Eight sources of feedback? Better than three, I guess. Thirty would be a heck of a lot better. 

The same is true for an IVF center's online reputation. When a fertility doctor has two scathingly negative reviews, one luke-warm review, and one glowing review, the public doesn't have enough information to accurately judge this physician. Very often, fertility doctors have unfavorable online profiles because they simply don't have a high enough volume of reviews on that particular platform. Forget these four motives for distrusting online review platforms; lack of volume is our worst enemy. The higher a clinic's volume, the more likely their reviews are to be positive. Period.

what to do now

Okay, Griffin. We've stopped resisting. We have a high volume of reviews but our ratings are still low. We still hate this. Make it go away.

disrupting the fertility field

If we've truly made it thus far, then we have the best road map for operational/personnel adjustments that we could ever ask for.  We have data to identify the most common problem areas in our practices and fix them. That's right, the same platforms that take control away from us give it right back...if we choose to act on it.

In my opinion, no review site makes it easier to evaluate customer service patterns than Fertility IQ. Clinics are rated by 

  • Operations
  • Scheduling
  • Billing department
  • Nursing Team

Physicians are rated by

  • Whether they treated their patient like a person or a number
  • Communication
  • How often they saw their patients at appointments
  • Response time

When we can measure how patients adore our nursing staff, and their disappointment in when their calls are returned, it's a lot easier to smoke out capacity-related issues that hinder the excellence of our practice experience. Of course we don't have to wait until patients leave our practice to listen to their stories. We can use tools like Press Ganey or Rep Check Up to solicit patient feedback, in-house. Public ratings are the final word, however, and in the eyes of the public, perception is reality.

a new review site is barely a baby serving of disruption

We've hardly seen the tip of the iceberg, my friends. If we cannot adapt to the reality of how patients use the internet to share their experiences, we are not long for what is to come. Regulation has sheltered healthcare from many of the market effects that have impacted other areas, but it won't hold forever. The executives of Zoc Doc, Vitals, and Health Grades are not worried about awkward run-ins at ASRM with physicians who subscribe to their premium offerings. They are interested in being the marketplace where patients find their providers.

FertilityIQ was started in the birthplace of many other innovative tech companies, the San Francisco Bay Area. It was started in the way most disruptive tech companies are, from outside. FertilityIQ doesn't receive funding from IVF clinics. They didn't need our permission to build their company and patients don't need our permission to share their experiences on their platform. This is what disruption looks like. Thousands of entrepreneurs are chomping at the bit to change healthcare in their own way. If we stay in the habit of yearning for control that we don't have, we will wistfully long for the days of unfavorable online profiles being our biggest pain in the neck.

Blockbuster Video chose to be nostalgic about the adventure of going to the video store. Netflix didn't. Marriott could have invented the world's most used lodging app; AirBnb was happy to do it instead. The largest taxi companies balked at the idea of hundreds of millions of passengers choosing to ride in a strangers' car; Uber bet the pot on it and became a multi-billion dollar company.

We are presented with an incredible moment in time to use new market opportunities to build the most successful versions of our practices. I started a company inside of our field, rather than outside, because it is far more agreeable to strategically adapt to technological and cultural change than to be rocked by the market. This is just advice, you certainly don't have to take it. Before you decide anything though, you might ask yourself if what you do now will make you right or wrong in the context of history.

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To learn more about how to improve your fertility practice's online reputation, and to adapt to new patient behavior, download your free copy of the Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing

Why did these 9 patients just leave word-of-mouth referrals for their fertility doctors on Instagram?

By Griffin Jones

**Fertility Bridge does not endorse any of the programs or doctors mentioned. They come from responses from our Instagram community**

"The only thing that matters is the lab"

That's what a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist (RE) told me over lunch at the 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) annual scientific congress. "The patient experience doesn't matter. The only thing that matters is if they get a baby or not." My efforts to show him all of the evidence to the contrary were fruitless. That was the end of the conversation. Why try to convince the inconvincible?

In some perverse way, it excites me when people are so neglectful of what our patient population demands. Meritocracy might be a lofty ideal, but I love working with fertility clinics who take IVF cycles from people who think like that. A slop-eating grin came over my face as I stared at his plate and thought of the perfect metaphor:

I'm going to eat your lunch.  

Who are they and what did people say?

Who are they and what did people say?

Satisfied don't mean delighted

A 2014 study by Software Advice states that 61% of patients evaluate their new doctor before their first appointment. Over 40% of new patients of Fertility Bridge clients confirm having read online reviews before scheduling their first visit. Nearly 30% say they were referred by a friend.

Bain's Net Promoter System suggests that patients can be divided into three categories across a satisfaction scale from 0 to 10. The single question is, "how likely are you to recommend our practice to a friend or family member?" Those who answer between 0 and 6 are called detractors. They actively discourage others from coming to your practice. Those who respond with a 7 or 8, are labeled passive, because their referral rates are less than 50% of those who respond with a 9 or 10. Finally, those who respond with 9 or 10 are promoters, people who sing the practice's praises to anyone who will listen. You can read more about using your practice culture to turn patients into promoters in Chapter 2 of the free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing.

I know many of these promoters very well. They brought me into the field of reproductive health in the first place. After all, people don't get so fired up after they buy a power washer from the Home Depot. So, among thousands of people in the trying-to-conceive (#ttc) community on Instagram, who are actively undergoing or pursuing fertility treatment I asked them the question. Would you recommend your fertility clinic, and why?

1). By Name in New England

Absolutely and I actually have. The first place we went to was terrible and I've shared that with people who have asked for recommendations. I wish I had done some thorough research beforehand but I wasn't aware how common infertility is and how many clinics were out there. The second place was beyond anything I could have hoped for! We saw Dr. Gargiulo at the Center For Reproductive Care (CRC) in Stratham, NH. We are less than an hour away from Boston which is home to some of the top hospitals in the country so we fortunately have a large number of places to choose from. The entire staff at CRC was absolutely fantastic.

I was greeted by name every single time I walked into the office and the nurses were amazing when it came to making the entire process less stressful and knowing when to crack a joke to lighten the mood. The thing that really set CRC apart was the welcome packet. In addition to the typical insurance forms they included an illustrated book that talked about how to talk to all of the different people in your life from co workers to your spouse. Also, they make sure to include that due to the sensitivity of this journey, no one under the age of 18 is allowed into the office for any reason. Reading that one policy was the moment I knew we had finally found the place that truly focuses on their patients and not their numbers.

2). Memorable in Montana

I totally would! I should mention, my RE and her partner are the only ones in the state. Even if she wasn't, I would still recommend her. Her name is Dr. Stacy Shomento with Billings Clinic. Dr. Shomento is in Bozeman, and that is the staff I know and love! She has a pile of patients, but always gives you lots of time and takes a personal interest in you. She also has a stellar, amazing, outgoing staff. Infertility is very personal and invasive. Having a comfortable relationship with the medical staff is a must for me.

She took the time to make personal connections and remembered us, not just our chart. Really, because RE's are so busy, you end up dealing a lot with your nurse, so they really need to be awesome.

3). Compassion in California

I totally would!!!! Coastal Fertility in Irvine, CA is the best! So compassionate. Dr. Werlin rocks!!! He's amazing!!!

4). Knowledge in New Jersey

I would. More specifically, I would recommend my doctor, even though all the doctors are great. Dr. Marcus Jurema from Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (RMANJ) is what every reproductive endocrinologist should be. I'm thankful I have him in my corner. My doctor is part of RMANJ and was originally with IVFNJ before the merge. I've had several issues with several staff members with both practices.

There's very little communication within the company within different departments (billing, nurses, etc). I'm sure that's because the company is just so big. With that being said, RMA has the best labs in the state, maybe the East Coast. Because of that, I can't leave. Plus, my doctor is amazing.

He teaches as he goes. He knows I need technical info, good or bad. I can't have anything sugar coated. I'm a medical assistant so I research everything. He knows that and will give it to me straight, while also holding my hand through the bad stuff. He's been with me from day one, with every cycle and every loss.

5). Benign in Boston

We switched doctors for our last round of IVF, but we stayed at the same clinic, IVF New England. The nurses are magnificent and since that's who you're interacting with the most, it's invaluable. I never felt like a number there, even though they're a bigger clinic. I always knew I was in good hands, even after 4 failures with my first doctor. It took me a long time to decide to switch. It broke my heart to try someone new, because I trusted him implicitly.

My new RE, Dr. Pauli is amazing. I don't regret not going to him sooner but I'm so glad I did. We were successful on our first round with him and I'm currently 11 weeks pregnant. I love that both doctors called with results of the bigger tests (pgd, era etc) and called to check in on us. Dr. P. called me once with results while he was on vacation.

I have nothing but good things to say about IVFNE. They're not perfect, and some of their methods aren't for everyone. But they are perfect for us. Even if we never got pregnant, I wouldn't feel any differently.

6). Education in the OC

Yep!!!! HRC Fertility in Newport Beach!! I think the best thing about HRC is the coordinator is amazing financing and they can do preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with a fresh transfer. My doctor was very, very busy all the time, but he did give me pregnant the first time. He never did an ultrasound which I thought was odd but I love the girl who did my ultrasounds.

My doctor was always kind, and answered all my questions but the relationship was definitely not personal. I don't care about that; I want results, and he provides results.

My tech was wonderful because she would walk me through exactly what she was doing. During stims, she would explain what she was counting, what she was looking for, and what she saw. Same after I became pregnant. They followed me for 11 weeks.

7). Making changes in Maryland

Our first one, absolutely not. We were a paycheck at [a very large fertility practice group] and never felt like patients. Our RE told me that our son "must have been a lucky egg and I wanted to go cry in the car, go ahead". It was the worst year of my life. My new doctor, Dr. Mary Ann Sorra with Natural Fertility, actually held my hand when I was put under for a laparoscopy. It feels so nice to finally be cared about.

8). Looked After in Louisiana

Definitely. Arklatex Fertility and Reproductive Health with Dr. Vandermolen. I just felt like they're all so patient. Any time I had questions, I could call the nurse and she would call me right back. They knew me by name. The success rate for the doctor is pretty high, which is always a plus. When I first went to him, he told me what was going on. I felt like I had options instead of having him tell me what I was going to do.

9). Genial in Jersey

Absolutely! RMANJ, because of their lab. I was told I was going to be treated as a number, but on the contrary, I got to talk with my RE personally. He even called me right before my egg retrieval to know how I was doing. The nurse was always on top of things and answered me right away.

The transfer was very detailed oriented. They addressed yeast infections and progesterone levels while my previous clinic always dismissed my concerns.

"A great lab is necessary, but not sufficient"--Jake Anderson-Bialis

While I chose not to include the names of these volunteer promoters, they are perfectly willing to share their experiences with thousands of other people in the infertility community on Instagram. We often believe that people only recommend their IVF center online if they become pregnant or have a baby. We're told that they'll leave negative comments if they have a failed cycle, but research from Fertility Bridge and Fertility IQ show that that's not exactly true.

True for almost every fertility clinic review we read.

True for almost every fertility clinic review we read.

"No question, if a patient has a good result, they're more likely to recommend their fertility doctor/clinic," says Fertility IQ co-founder, Jake Anderson. "With that said, when we look at patients who had failed cycles, it's very clear who is likely to recommend the doctor, and who definitely won't."

It seems that the contrapositive is also valid; when we look at patients who've had successful cycles, it's clear who will be the source of future patients in the form of word-of-mouth referrals. Many people have success at their fertility centers and are "satisfied", but we see in these recommendations that it's compassion and personal connection that turn former IVF patients into zealous promoters of their practices. So the next time a competing fertility doctor tries to convince you that the patient experience is meaningless, and clinical outcomes are all that matter, don't feel disappointed when you can't change his mind. Eat his f'ing lunch.

_________________

For strategy on improving the patient experience, read chapter 2 of my free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing, by clicking the button below.

 

 

 

The 7 Steps of the Fertility Bridge Proven Process for Tracking IVF Marketing Results

How we measure and improve our KPIs (key performance indicators) in the fertility field.

How we measure and improve our KPIs (key performance indicators) in the fertility field.

how do we measure the return on investment (ROI) of an ivf marketing program?

Jackie Sharpe is Regional Marketing Director for HRC Fertility in Southern California. Once, at an Association for Reproductive Managers (ARM) marketing meeting, I asked Jackie, "Is it easier, or harder, to track the effectiveness of marketing today than it was several years ago?"

I could tell she had thought about it before. "It's harder," she replied.

Harder? We have every tool under the sun, from Google Analytics to every kind of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software and marketing dashboard. We can track every click, page view, Instagram like, Yelp review...everything down to how many minutes the average visitor spends on our website. How is it not easier than ever to track our ROI? Yet, you know what? She's absolutely right.

It's harder to singularly track patient sourcing, not only in spite of these infinite tools, but partly because of them. The  avenues from which today's patient becomes aware of our services are virtually limitless. So too, are the factors that can influence her decision. We need a system, as opposed to a single figure.

indispensable indicators need to be analyzed together

In my last blog post, I wrote about the Six Indispensable Indicators that IVF Marketing is Doomed Without. There are six, because individually, none of them offer us a wholly accurate synopsis of our marketing results. Whether we use the hottest CRM, or an Excel workbook, tools do not replace our overall system for tracking and measuring results. Two examples explain why we report on multiple sources of data.

  1. Human Omission: About 1/3 of patients of Fertility Bridge clients do not fully complete their referral-source questionnaires.  Furthermore, the number of questionnaires entered by the practice is typically only 75% of the total number of new patient visits.  
     
  2. Limits to Digital Tracking: We track internet goals (i.e. appointment requests), but sources are frequently only attributed to the most direct channel. In simpler terms, an IVF clinic on the west coast hosts informational fertility sessions at their offices. When we run ads on social media, registrations increase. On the submission form, registrants overwhelmingly check Facebook or Instagram as the sources of how they came to hear about the event. Still, when we look at our goals in Google Analytics or Hubspot, a much smaller percentage are credited for coming directly from any one channel. 

Instead of relying on numbers that provide incomplete information, we use a proven system that includes our Indispensable Indicators. Functioning as a whole, the system allows us to measure and understand the effectiveness of our efforts, and subsequently, the money we're spending. These are the seven steps of the Fertility Bridge Proven Process for Tracking Marketing Results that we implement with each new client.

1). Put the right person in the right seat

Someone inside the clinic must own your Indispensable Indicators. If these data are not readily available and accounted for, then the marketing strategy operates aimlessly. This person is often the practice administrator. He or she may be the clinic liaison, marketing director, or billing manager. Ideally, this is someone who is fascinated with being a student of your practice's key performance indicators. If the person has neither the authority nor the capacity to implement all of the steps involved in the Proven Process for Tracking Results, the point is moot. Whoever is chosen, he or she is responsible for reporting on the Indispensable Indicators every single month.

2). Collect existing data

Because of clinical reporting, you likely know your clinic's IVF volume, year-to-year, but that doesn't tell us anything about our monthly progress. We still don't know what impact individual marketing efforts have had on profit and patient volume.  In this phase of the Proven Process for Tracking Results, we gather all of the information we have for our Six Indispensable Indicators and enter them into one file. It's likely that you don't have complete figures for all six indicators, but partial information is a start. If you use a practice software like eIVF, you may be able to readily pull some of these fields.

3). create uniformity

Even when clinics do record some of their necessary KPIs, we at Fertility Bridge often find that we're not comparing apples to apples. The way you define your Indispensable Indicators can be customized to your practice, but they must be defined to ensure continuity. 

Monthly recorded table of Indispensable Indicators

Monthly recorded table of Indispensable Indicators

1). Lead

Is a phone inquiry, a website appointment request, and an RSVP to a fertility seminar all worth the same?

2). New Patient Visit

Does this include patients who had a successful IVF cycle with your practice but come back for babies two and three? Only someone who comes to the practice for the first time? Phone consults? Couples (including same-sex couples)? Individual female patients? Male and female patients separately?

Define new patient visits so that there are no duplicate or missing appointment numbers.

3). New Patient Sources

One clinic on the east coast had "the internet" listed as one of four questionnaire options for more than six years. So of course, from 2010 to 2016 the number of people that came from the internet increased by nearly 70%. But the internet has changed a lot in six years. What does "the internet" mean? Online reviews? Referrals from friends through social media? Searching for reproductive health services?

Offer different referral sourcing options to which respondents check "yes" or "no" to reduce ambiguity.

4). IVF cycles: For business purposes, how do we define an IVF cycle? Starts? Frozen transfers? Once the cycle bills? Does our number include restarts? Cancellations?

Again, the objective is to avoid duplication. An IVF cycle, as it is billed, should be unique to a particular month.

5). IVF Conversion Rates

If New Patient Visits and IVF Cycles aren't uniform, this number will start to look really funky.

6). Gross Revenue

4). Set benchmarks

Once we have our figures, month-to-month, we have clear benchmarks from which to measure our progress. The more months of data, the more reliable the benchmarks. It typically takes Fertility Bridge clients at least three months to collect this data; it's not readily available.

5). Set Internet Goals

Marketing dashboard customized for fertility clinics

Marketing dashboard customized for fertility clinics

Many IVF clinics have appointment request forms on their websites, but most do not have goals set for these forms in Google Analytics. Using a thank-you page for these forms, we track how many appointment requests and contact forms we receive on a weekly and monthly basis. Depending on your practice's size, you may have anywhere from fifty to several hundred of these forms completed in a given month. The person in charge of your Indispensable Indicators  checks how many inquiries went on to schedule new patient visits. Once we know how many new patient visits lead to an IVF cycle, we can even assign dollar values to these goals. 

6). Link the appropriate online properties

All vessels must row in the same direction. When we run a pay-per-click campaign on Google, Bing, or Yahoo, for example, we sync with your website's Google Analytics account so that we can measure the effectiveness of your campaigns in one place. When we run Facebook and Instagram ads, we install a pixel on your practice's website to show us how our ads convert. It's another way of seeing how many people fill out a form submission when coming from these channels.

Tracking how many request appointment forms came from a Facebook campaign

Tracking how many request appointment forms came from a Facebook campaign

7). Collect Weekly. Report Monthly

Tracking these numbers at the end of each month would be a bear. It's much easier to record them as they come in. Weekly recording also provides greater accountability; we don't wait until the end of the month to realize that we are missing our Indispensable Indicators

the whole is greater than the sum of its parts

We have a year of data on IVF cycles, patient volume, and referral sourcing. At month 12, we feel comfortable making a shift in our marketing strategy. We decide to take half of the budget that we had spent on print advertising, and spend it on paid social media advertising. How do we track the return on investment of our new advertising campaign?

If we've only recorded one number, we likely won't be able to.  If between months 12 and 15, however, we have the necessary data to see

  • A 30% increase in new patient appointments.
  • An 18% increase in new appointment requests submitted from visitors coming from social media, and
  • A 50% increase in the number of patients who report coming to our practice after having seen us on social media

then we can reasonably conclude that that marketing campaign was successful.

In a vacuum, none of these figures give us enough information to gauge the effectiveness of our marketing efforts. Because there are so many factors for which to account, we implement one system to measure and understand them. Individually, they are incomplete, and can therefore be misleading. When we organize and rely on our Six Indispensable Indicators, however, our IVF marketing's return on investment becomes greater than ever.

For more tools and tactics on measuring your fertility marketing efforts, read chapter 2 of my free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing.

 

 

6 Indispensable Numbers Your IVF Marketing is Doomed Without

By Griffin Jones

so...What can you do for me?

When a fertility doctor (or any business owner for that matter) hires a marketer, they very often want to know, to the dollar, what the results will be.

Imagine if I bragged, "My company will increase your new patient visits by 40%!" Would they know, even remotely to the number, what a 40% increase looks like? Would they know to what they could attribute the increase? I've found that the answer is almost always no, because in the fertility field, we rarely have the data we need to gauge the effectiveness of our marketing. Even less often is that data readily accessible. I called this The Biggest Marketing Challenge Facing Fertility Centers, back in 2016. Unfortunately, not much has changed.

We need to know certain Key Performance Indicators (KPI) to measure fertility practice growth

We need to know certain Key Performance Indicators (KPI) to measure fertility practice growth

Extreme Ownership

To be completely fair, incomplete or non-existent tracking of key performance indicators (KPI) is not  a phenomenon that is unique to fertility clinics, or even small healthcare practices. I've written about it at length in The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing; many marketers complain that their clients don't track the volume and sourcing of their customers and revenue. How can one be held to a measure of success if we don't have enough (or any) measurements? Years ago, I decided to hone the focus of my marketing company to the field of fertility, because I needed to take extreme ownership of certain Indispensable Indicators. Collecting, reporting on, storing, and making decisions from these Indispensable Indicators are part of the Fertility Bridge Proven Process for Tracking Results.

6 Indispensable Indicators Every Fertility Center Needs To Know

  1. Leads
    1. The total number of phone inquiries, contact submissions, new appointment requests, new patient e-mails, webinar registrants, and seminar attendees who give their contact information to the IVF center.
  2. New Patient Visits
    1. The total number of appointments scheduled by new patients or returning patients starting new treatment.
  3. New Patient Sources
    1. All of the ways that new patients learned about the practice before scheduling their first appointment.
  4.  IVF cycles
    1. The total number of unique IVF cycles started or billed to a particular month.
  5. Conversion Rates
    1. The percentage of leads that become new patient visits and the percentage of new patient visits that go on to start IVF cycles.
  6. Gross Monthly Revenue

Indispensable Indicators in action

In the following example, watch how effective these figures make our decisions on patient recruitment. We have a year of data on IVF cycles, patient volume, and referral sourcing. At month 12, we feel comfortable making a shift in our marketing strategy. We decide to take half of the budget that we had spent on print advertising, and spend it on paid social media advertising. Why?

Instead of gambling on a hunch, we operate with data from our Indispensable Indicators.  Between months 12 and 15, we see a

  • 30% increase in new patient appointments.
  • 18% increase in new appointment requests submitted from visitors coming from social media
  • 50% increase in the number of patients who report coming to our practice after having seen us on social media

We had enough data to reasonably make this first marketing decision, and now we have even more data to make the next one.

is branding dead?

Instead of thinking in terms of practice development, we frequently view marketing as tit-for-tat; purchase x advertising, receive y result. There are plenty of lead-generation sites, agencies, and pay-per-click platforms from which we can buy leads. Sometimes it's prudent to buy appointments in these ways, it's just not business development.

One REI from a small U.S. market, who participated in a fertility marketing network asked me, "how do I know whether or not the patients they send would have come to me anyway?" 

We don't.

patient relations in fertility marketing

Until we have access to some kind of Orwellian brain-mapping technology, we'll never know all of the reasons that someone came to our practice. To think that we can account for every one of our team's achievements with six key performance indicators would be very short-sighted. In fact, it would be very limiting to the brand and long-term vision of the practice.

Rather than accomplish top-line marketing goals, our Indispensable Indicators measure the bottom-line of our marketing efforts. Without them, we spend time, money, and energy aimlessly. With them, we have real, specific, and measurable objectives to which we are accountable. At last, we can focus on the progress of our long-term strategy.

Not sure where to start with your Indispensable Indicators? In my next blog post, I outline the steps of the Fertility Bridge Proven Process for Tracking Results! In the meantime, click below to read Chapter 1 (Defining Marketing Strategy) of my absolutely free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing.

What 22 Infertility Bloggers Hated About Choosing Their Fertility Clinic

By Griffin Jones

"a prudent question is one half of wisdom"--francis bacon

Recently, someone who is very involved in the field of infertility reinforced what hundreds of patients have told me for two years; there's an astounding gap between the way many fertility practices deliver their services and what patients want and expect. That's exactly why our company has the word "Bridge" in its name. According to a study conducted in 2012 by Forrester, 80% of companies say they deliver superior service to their customers. Meanwhile, only 8% of those companies received a superior customer rating. If you're seeking treatment for infertility, the delivery of the services you receive should be nothing less than superior. No clinic is entitled to your selection. Even in states and countries where some rounds of IVF are covered, there are still many circumstances in which you could pay tens of thousands of dollars of your own money. If you live in a large enough area, or are able to travel, you have a choice. Your choice isn't an easy one to make, given how much is at stake. I don't own any fertility centers (...yet), but because we direct their marketing based on what you tell us, I'll speak about them in the first person voice.

Getting out of our own way

infertility blogger round up

As fertility practice groups, we sometimes spend a lot of money in an attempt to help you make that decision. Or at least we think we do. Sometimes we try to grow our practices without any strong understanding of what you need to feel comfortable (and eventually very satisfied) to move forward with treatment at our center or someone else's. We frequently forget that there is a simpler way of earning your choice. We could remove the unnecessary challenges, annoyances, uncertainties, and causes for anxiety that you face when you are searching for a fertility specialist. How do we build not just a proven marketing system, but an entire practice culture, around what goes through your mind when you debate coming to our clinic, another practice group, or seeking no treatment at all? This is a laborious and continuing process, but I had a crazy idea of where to start when I entered this field, and I decided to do it again.

I asked you.

In early 2015, I wrote a report from interviews with several infertility peer support group leaders. This time, I decided to ask over twenty prominent infertility bloggers to candidly answer the same short question. One question isn't enough to understand everything involved in how you decide which practice will play this instrumental role in your life, and what we need to do to make you feel very good about that decision. We need as much feedback as we can possibly get. We need to ask follow up questions, issue patient satisfaction surveys, read what you say anonymously about us online, take action on your collective input and repeat that process forever. Still, in their own right, the candid answers of several different people to the same question is very insightful. I chose bloggers because they have not only a wealth of personal experience, but also because they are each in contact with hundreds of other people who deal with infertility. They are on the pulse of the infertility community. As you'll read, there are several reasons why people choose clinics, and they're not mutually exclusive. 

20 infertility bloggers all answered one question

20 infertility bloggers all answered one question

What was the most annoying part about choosing your fertility clinic?"

OVERWHELMING OPTIONS

In Due Time , @caroline_induetime 
"There are too many clinics to choose from. It's so hard to choose one".

No Bun in the Oven @nobunintheoven 
"Choosing a fertility clinic is an overwhelming experience because it's an expensive process! The most annoying part of finding my clinic was finding reliable experiences about the doctors. Where is the Rate My Fertility Doctor website? Where can a couple go to find real life experiences on these professionals who are getting paid tens of thousands of dollars for treatment? It was hard to find and we were ultimately left shopping at several clinics before finding the 'right one' for us".

Hoping for a Best@hopingforbabybest
"Wondering if you made the right choice".

Anonymous 

"Just scared of making the wrong choice".

UNCLEAR COSTS/BILLING

Smart Fertility Choices, @SmartFertilityChoices
"It was difficult to understand the entire cost involved in doing a cycle".

Rad Kitten@RadKitten
"Cost first and foremost. Second is beside manner. I'm not just a paycheck, I'm a person".

TTC a Taxson Baby@ttcataxsonbaby
"The most annoying part about choosing my fertility clinic was finding out that they don't take either of our insurances! Annoying and frustrating"!

Happiness Glass@happinessglass_
"That insurance dictates where you can or cannot go. Also I chose based on location/convenience to me rather than quality of service".

Amateur Nester, @amateurnester
"I found it frustrating that most clinics didn't have their costs listed on their websites. It would have made planning much easier if we'd had this information up front".

Its Positive Living, @its_positive
"Insurance (not having many options to chose from in my network/being tied to my network ... I have an HMO)".

THE RIGHT FIT WITH THE RIGHT PERSONNEL

The 2 Week Wait, @the2weekwait
"It was finding both a doctor and suggested protocol I truly felt enthusiastic about. To me, success rates can be manipulated, other patient opinions can vary and ultimately - nothing is more reliable than your own gut. If a doctor clicks with you, if the treatment suggested makes sense and you feel good about, that's all you need".

PCOS Diva, @PCOSDiva
It is disappointing when doctors do not have a solid understanding of how to treat PCOS using lifestyle modification as first line therapy.

Expecting Anything, @expectinganything
The most annoying part for me was the "marketing" behind this process by doctors/clinics. I mean, I get that it's a business for them, but some doctors forget that we are human, and this is real life shit for us! They all have different "sell tactics". They either beat you down and make you feel really bad or depressed about your situation, or they try to be overly sincere and emotional. We just want some facts and compassion people! Is it that hard!? I don't need to see all of the trophies "ie, baby pictures" plastered on the walls or some premeditated sob story. Show me your success rates and that you give a shit. It's that easy!

Our Misconception@ourmisconception
"The gatekeepers. You know the receptionists. These are the first faces you will see and the first you speak to when scheduling a consult or an appointment. They will be the ones that set the tone for the rest of the patient/user experience. Having navigated a cacophony of medical offices, this is an area/industry where empathy, education of the patient and social etiquette need to be greatly invested in as it lacks in most cases. My husband once had to spell out craniotomy to the appointment scheduler of his brain surgeons office. True story".

Triumphs and Trials@triumphsandtrials
"The most annoying part was going in to it blindly. Not knowing what the doctors were like and if they would be a good fit".

Anonymous 
"I needed an individualized approach on my treatment and a specialist who is willing to spare time to answer my questions and stay on top of all the details about my case. Not every clinic can do that due to patient volume. I was glad I was able to find the clinic I dreamed for after trying a big center in bay area, CA".

A LACK OF ALTERNATIVES

Infertile Soil, @infertilesoil
"In Canada you need to be referred to a fertility clinic (sometimes clinics will charge you if you don't have a referral) and many times doctors will refer you to just one particular clinic.

SIFTING THROUGH COMPLICATED INFORMATION

Trials Bring Joy@chels819
"Navigating outdated SART data".

AN EASY CHOICE FROM A TRUSTED SOURCE

Secret Infertility@FranMeadows
"I had a transition with ease since my OB/GYN referred me over to a fertility doctor that they personally used. This helped me feel more confident from the moment I walked through their doors. There was nothing annoying about me choosing a doctor".

 Life Abundant@lifeabundant_jw
"Nothing. My OB is able to do everything except IVF and is very knowledgeable in infertility treatment practice after doing her residency in a fertility clinic, so I have gotten lucky and have the best of both worlds. If we need IVF, I'll have to go elsewhere, and I will connect with her residency clinic and the doctor she trained under".

LET'S NOT MAKE THIS ANY HARDER THAN IT HAS TO BE

Hilariously Infertile, @hilariously_infertile
Uhhh. Being freakin' infertile is the most annoying part about choosing a fertility clinic.

Waiting In Hope, @waiting_in_hope
Honestly the most annoying part about choosing a fertility clinic is having to choose one AT ALL. Having to acknowledge the need for a fertility clinic/reproductive endocrinologist is heart breaking. It’s an acceptance that something is wrong. You have to grieve the loss of having a baby the “normal OB/GYN” route. And that it just might not be "easy".

Give the people what they want

As much as it's a service to you to equip you with clear information to make your decision, really, it's in our own best interest. The most effective way to grow our practices is through the detailed execution of a very simple premise: give you what you want. You can't decide on a clinic because you have no idea how SART success rates are being presented? Guess we need to make a video explaining SART data in plain English. You can't compare IVF costs between our competitors because no one will give you a straight answer? Sounds like we need to make an IVF cost checklist that you can download to compare potential additional costs. You felt isolated during your time at our practice because we never told you about support groups in our area? Apparently we need to make sure all of our patients go home knowing about the online, professional, and peer support resources that are available to them. In the age of ubiquitous communication, there is no shortage of ways to be able to collect and validate your input. Some clinics will ignore you and tell themselves they do a great job of getting you the information you want. Others will heed your suggestions and grow because of it. These are the clinics that deserve your choice, because you deserve nothing less.

Do you have something you want to say about your experience with your practice? Good, bad, or neutral? Please leave a comment or send me an e-mail! I would love to hear what you have to say.

How Much Does IVF Really Cost? Why No One Will Tell You The Plain, Ugly Truth

By Griffin Jones

How do people feel about the financial charges associated with IVF? I don't know, you tell me.

  • "Incompetent or possibly fraudulent insurance practices"
  • "Almost a year later I am still unable to officially take care of my billing issues"
  • "They have no problem with asking me for money but pointing out there was a descrepancy [sic] in billing no one would answer"

All of these comments come from real fertility clinic reviews. Is this frustration familiar to you? Financial stress is one of the biggest pain points in dealing with infertility and it sometimes negatively influences your relationship with your fertility clinic. As if infertility didn't already give you enough to deal with, its best medical solution is one of the most expensive endeavors you'll ever face. Some people talk about the cost of IVF in terms of financial infertility, because it is the most common obstacle that prevents couples and individuals from seeking treatment. We frequently see GoFundMe and other crowdfunding campaigns to raise money for IVF. In most U.S. states and Canadian provinces, the expense of IVF is paid out of pocket. Even in the United Kingdom, where the National Health System (NHS) covers most health expenses, there are still many people in the U.K. who don't qualify for the terms of coverage and they too have to pay from their own accounts.

Organizations like RESOLVE advocate for broader and deeper coverage of fertility treatment and you can join them for their 2016 infertility advocacy day on May 11.  Still, even in states like Massachusetts where insurance companies are mandated to offer IVF coverage, you find plenty of complaints about billing and unexpected charges.  At issue, there are many items you can be charged for because needs vary from patient to patient. It's not uncommon to see posts from people who say they've spent over $50,000 on costs associated with IVF. That's a wide leap from the IVF packages listed at $7,500. 

This variance poses a problem to you as you search for information to properly plan your budget. In the spring of 2015, I surveyed a small group of people dealing with infertility who listed cost confusion as one of their three most common pain-points in dealing with their clinics. You want a clear answer.  You want the transparency that you enjoy in almost every sector in which you spend your money. You instantly pay for everything else at fixed prices from Amazon, Priceline, Fandango, and Blue Apron. Why can't you get a straight answer about how much IVF will run you? You need to know what costs you'll incur and how much of it will be covered by insurance in order to budget for your treatment. Why aren't clinics more transparent with you? 

The answer is multi-faceted, so let's dig into it.

Hidden costs in IVF

proven fact: insurance is the devil

Let's start with one of the very few, axiomatic, incontrovertible laws of the universe: insurance is a nightmare. Remember the national debate we had about healthcare coverage just a few years ago? Effectively, the arguments centered around whose solution would make our horrible payer system even more horrible. The problem certainly isn't unique to fertility care; all of healthcare is plagued by the problem of cost uncertainty.  A study conducted by Consumer Reports shows that billing disputes are the third most common complaint Americans have about their doctors. Why can't a provider tell you how much a service will cost before you decide to go through with it? CEO of tech startup, PokitDok, Lisa Maki, says that people "are trapped by a system that requires that they agree to a service with no knowledge of what the outcome or what the consequences might be to them financially". It's a conundrum. Put yourself in the position of the billing manager; they hate it just as much as you do.

does insurance even cover ivf?

Glad you asked. Every U.S. state and Canadian province is different. In the United States, some states have mandated coverage. If you don't know the universal definition of mandated coverage for infertility...it's because there isn't one. It's helpful that RESOLVE grades states based on how much coverage is mandated. Some states like New York and Texas may be considered mandated states, but their coverage varies. In New York, insurance companies are mandated to cover certain treatments like IUI, but not IVF. In Texas, insurance companies are required to offer coverage in plans to employers, but employers do not have to purchase those plans.

IVF cost confusing

Even in states like Massachusetts and Illinois, the law doesn't apply to certain types of employers, such as those who self-insure. What's more, you may live in a mandated state, but if your employer is not based in that state, then your home state's coverage doesn't apply to you. Don't forget about deductibles, either. You may need to spend a certain amount before insurance will pay for anything. Certain tests and medications might be covered and some might not. If you'd like to take a look at your clinic's website to see what insurances they accept, that won't help much. Every person's coverage depends on their individual plan. What might be covered for your co-worker might not be for you.

the ivf package price is not the total cost of treatment

Is your head spinning yet? We'll table the idea of insurance for the moment. Let's approach this as though you're paying entirely out of pocket. What other costs might you incur in addition to the price of the IVF cycle?

  • Tests. Ask your IVF coordinator if your package has a limit on labs or ultrasounds during treatment. If there is a limit, how many labs and ultrasounds are included and how much is each additional?
  • Medications. Which drugs are included in the package and which are not? How much do they cost? Is your doctor able to prescribe generic or other brand labels that might be covered by insurance? Are you allowed to buy them on your own?
  • Labs. Does your clinic have an in-house endocrine lab or are your labs sent out to a third party? Labs will be drawn throughout your treatment that need to be resulted the same day. If your labs are sent to a third party, there may be an additional cost to you. 
  •  ICSI. Is Introcytoplasmic Sperm Injection included in the package? According to Sher Fertility Institute, ICSI is often required when cases involve the severest degrees of male infertility. 
  • Embryo freezing. Some clinics will store your embryos in cryopreservation for six months after your IVF cycle, and some might include it for a year. How many months are included in your IVF package? What is the fee for each additional month of storage? 
There are even more potential costs associated with IVF

There are even more potential costs associated with IVF

  • Anesthesia.  If the clinic doesn't disclose whether or not anesthesia is included, it is likely that they charge an additional fee.
  • Donor eggs. Donor egg prices are not included in IVF packages unless specifically mentioned in separate pricing. The clinic may have their own donor bank or they may use a third party. If this is a need of yours, it will mean additional costs.
  • Surrogacy. If you have this need, the total cost of surrogacy may be as high as $150,000. 
  • PGD. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis can greatly improve pregnancy success rates by carefully selecting embryos. For older women, and women who have suffered early pregnancy loss, PGD may be all but necessary. Rarely do IVF packages include the cost of PGD.

See? Now you understand why it's so hard for clinics to quote one all-encompassing price for IVF, beyond the most basic IVF package. Rachel Gurevich of About Health reports that the total cost of IVF treatment averages around $20,000, as opposed to the $12,000 average cycle price. There are so many moving parts, it's virtually impossible to give you one set price. As far as clinics are concerned, they need to start displaying "sample pricing". As far as you're concerned, it's better to estimate very conservatively.

then why the heck doesn't my clinic just tell me all this?

This is a great question and it's part of the reason I wrote this post. Fertility practices need to get better at educating prospective patients on cost complexity. From my observation as a marketer, some fertility centers aren't good at discussing finances for two main reasons.

  1. Doctors don't like to talk about money. Generally speaking, they find it unbecoming of the conduct of a physician. They hold the patient-physician relationship to be very sacred and they don't want to cause you to think otherwise. They want you to know that they are invested in your care and not the financial arrangement behind it. I see two scenarios play out in online reviews--one that validates physicians'reluctance to talk about money and one that reveals an adverse effect. In the first scenario, the doctor is perceived as "money-grubbing" or trying to "sell" IVF. In the second, people are surprised by a bill and they lash out at their practice for a charge they weren't expecting. Finance isn't an easy subject to bring up, and that's why most physicians leave the discussion to their billing department. The appropriate sales conversation for infertility treatment is content for another post.
  2. Clinics are afraid to be punished for doing the right thing. What happens when a fertility practice tells you to budget $20,000, and you get a quote of $8,000 from one of their competitors? To a degree, this concern is justified. Tests show that, if not supported by the necessary context, pricing can sometimes drive people away. I would know. I am not the cheapest marketer that someone can hire and I never want to be. When I quote someone for a price, I want to include everything they might need. If I tell someone they should budget for a marketing strategy at $6,000/month, I include an advertising budget, graphic design, web development, etc. Someone else might tell them that they charge $600 per month for marketing services. That $600 doesn't do much but it sure sounds better than $6,000. No matter the service, people often ask about price before considering the total value being offered. This creates an undesirable cycle: you won't tell me your pricing until I'm more interested; I'm not interested until I know your pricing. This is very annoying for both parties involved, fertility centers and their patients.

be an educated consumer, and make sure they know it

So why should your  fertility clinic show you detailed sample pricing? Are they trapped in a catch 22? Tests prove that the advantages of publishing prices far outweigh the disadvantages Think of it this way. Do you ever stop shopping before you know what the price is? What is the cost of a ride across town? You won't know until the cab stops and adjusts their meter. So you choose Uber, because you see the price in advance, and peer reviews validate the experience you're looking for. To compete for your selection, fertility clinics need to be more upfront with pricing. Leave that part to me.

For your part, the more educated you are as a patient-consumer, the more information practices will have to provide to you ahead of time. You are now conversational in the basics of infertility financing. You will be fluent by the end of your journey. To start, you have some background knowledge of which costs to investigate. Clinics are reluctant to share more information on pricing, partly because they are concerned that their competitors will get away with cost ambiguity. Don't let competing fertility clinics win by giving you less information. As an educated patient-consumer, you have the power to let transparency rule the day.