Instagram for fertility clinics

Why did these 9 patients just leave word-of-mouth referrals for their fertility doctors on Instagram?

By Griffin Jones

**Fertility Bridge does not endorse any of the programs or doctors mentioned. They come from responses from our Instagram community**

"The only thing that matters is the lab"

That's what a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist (RE) told me over lunch at the 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) annual scientific congress. "The patient experience doesn't matter. The only thing that matters is if they get a baby or not." My efforts to show him all of the evidence to the contrary were fruitless. That was the end of the conversation. Why try to convince the inconvincible?

In some perverse way, it excites me when people are so neglectful of what our patient population demands. Meritocracy might be a lofty ideal, but I love working with fertility clinics who take IVF cycles from people who think like that. A slop-eating grin came over my face as I stared at his plate and thought of the perfect metaphor:

I'm going to eat your lunch.  

Who are they and what did people say?

Who are they and what did people say?

Satisfied don't mean delighted

A 2014 study by Software Advice states that 61% of patients evaluate their new doctor before their first appointment. Over 40% of new patients of Fertility Bridge clients confirm having read online reviews before scheduling their first visit. Nearly 30% say they were referred by a friend.

Bain's Net Promoter System suggests that patients can be divided into three categories across a satisfaction scale from 0 to 10. The single question is, "how likely are you to recommend our practice to a friend or family member?" Those who answer between 0 and 6 are called detractors. They actively discourage others from coming to your practice. Those who respond with a 7 or 8, are labeled passive, because their referral rates are less than 50% of those who respond with a 9 or 10. Finally, those who respond with 9 or 10 are promoters, people who sing the practice's praises to anyone who will listen. You can read more about using your practice culture to turn patients into promoters in Chapter 2 of the free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing.

I know many of these promoters very well. They brought me into the field of reproductive health in the first place. After all, people don't get so fired up after they buy a power washer from the Home Depot. So, among thousands of people in the trying-to-conceive (#ttc) community on Instagram, who are actively undergoing or pursuing fertility treatment I asked them the question. Would you recommend your fertility clinic, and why?

1). By Name in New England

Absolutely and I actually have. The first place we went to was terrible and I've shared that with people who have asked for recommendations. I wish I had done some thorough research beforehand but I wasn't aware how common infertility is and how many clinics were out there. The second place was beyond anything I could have hoped for! We saw Dr. Gargiulo at the Center For Reproductive Care (CRC) in Stratham, NH. We are less than an hour away from Boston which is home to some of the top hospitals in the country so we fortunately have a large number of places to choose from. The entire staff at CRC was absolutely fantastic.

I was greeted by name every single time I walked into the office and the nurses were amazing when it came to making the entire process less stressful and knowing when to crack a joke to lighten the mood. The thing that really set CRC apart was the welcome packet. In addition to the typical insurance forms they included an illustrated book that talked about how to talk to all of the different people in your life from co workers to your spouse. Also, they make sure to include that due to the sensitivity of this journey, no one under the age of 18 is allowed into the office for any reason. Reading that one policy was the moment I knew we had finally found the place that truly focuses on their patients and not their numbers.

2). Memorable in Montana

I totally would! I should mention, my RE and her partner are the only ones in the state. Even if she wasn't, I would still recommend her. Her name is Dr. Stacy Shomento with Billings Clinic. Dr. Shomento is in Bozeman, and that is the staff I know and love! She has a pile of patients, but always gives you lots of time and takes a personal interest in you. She also has a stellar, amazing, outgoing staff. Infertility is very personal and invasive. Having a comfortable relationship with the medical staff is a must for me.

She took the time to make personal connections and remembered us, not just our chart. Really, because RE's are so busy, you end up dealing a lot with your nurse, so they really need to be awesome.

3). Compassion in California

I totally would!!!! Coastal Fertility in Irvine, CA is the best! So compassionate. Dr. Werlin rocks!!! He's amazing!!!

4). Knowledge in New Jersey

I would. More specifically, I would recommend my doctor, even though all the doctors are great. Dr. Marcus Jurema from Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (RMANJ) is what every reproductive endocrinologist should be. I'm thankful I have him in my corner. My doctor is part of RMANJ and was originally with IVFNJ before the merge. I've had several issues with several staff members with both practices.

There's very little communication within the company within different departments (billing, nurses, etc). I'm sure that's because the company is just so big. With that being said, RMA has the best labs in the state, maybe the East Coast. Because of that, I can't leave. Plus, my doctor is amazing.

He teaches as he goes. He knows I need technical info, good or bad. I can't have anything sugar coated. I'm a medical assistant so I research everything. He knows that and will give it to me straight, while also holding my hand through the bad stuff. He's been with me from day one, with every cycle and every loss.

5). Benign in Boston

We switched doctors for our last round of IVF, but we stayed at the same clinic, IVF New England. The nurses are magnificent and since that's who you're interacting with the most, it's invaluable. I never felt like a number there, even though they're a bigger clinic. I always knew I was in good hands, even after 4 failures with my first doctor. It took me a long time to decide to switch. It broke my heart to try someone new, because I trusted him implicitly.

My new RE, Dr. Pauli is amazing. I don't regret not going to him sooner but I'm so glad I did. We were successful on our first round with him and I'm currently 11 weeks pregnant. I love that both doctors called with results of the bigger tests (pgd, era etc) and called to check in on us. Dr. P. called me once with results while he was on vacation.

I have nothing but good things to say about IVFNE. They're not perfect, and some of their methods aren't for everyone. But they are perfect for us. Even if we never got pregnant, I wouldn't feel any differently.

6). Education in the OC

Yep!!!! HRC Fertility in Newport Beach!! I think the best thing about HRC is the coordinator is amazing financing and they can do preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with a fresh transfer. My doctor was very, very busy all the time, but he did give me pregnant the first time. He never did an ultrasound which I thought was odd but I love the girl who did my ultrasounds.

My doctor was always kind, and answered all my questions but the relationship was definitely not personal. I don't care about that; I want results, and he provides results.

My tech was wonderful because she would walk me through exactly what she was doing. During stims, she would explain what she was counting, what she was looking for, and what she saw. Same after I became pregnant. They followed me for 11 weeks.

7). Making changes in Maryland

Our first one, absolutely not. We were a paycheck at [a very large fertility practice group] and never felt like patients. Our RE told me that our son "must have been a lucky egg and I wanted to go cry in the car, go ahead". It was the worst year of my life. My new doctor, Dr. Mary Ann Sorra with Natural Fertility, actually held my hand when I was put under for a laparoscopy. It feels so nice to finally be cared about.

8). Looked After in Louisiana

Definitely. Arklatex Fertility and Reproductive Health with Dr. Vandermolen. I just felt like they're all so patient. Any time I had questions, I could call the nurse and she would call me right back. They knew me by name. The success rate for the doctor is pretty high, which is always a plus. When I first went to him, he told me what was going on. I felt like I had options instead of having him tell me what I was going to do.

9). Genial in Jersey

Absolutely! RMANJ, because of their lab. I was told I was going to be treated as a number, but on the contrary, I got to talk with my RE personally. He even called me right before my egg retrieval to know how I was doing. The nurse was always on top of things and answered me right away.

The transfer was very detailed oriented. They addressed yeast infections and progesterone levels while my previous clinic always dismissed my concerns.

"A great lab is necessary, but not sufficient"--Jake Anderson-Bialis

While I chose not to include the names of these volunteer promoters, they are perfectly willing to share their experiences with thousands of other people in the infertility community on Instagram. We often believe that people only recommend their IVF center online if they become pregnant or have a baby. We're told that they'll leave negative comments if they have a failed cycle, but research from Fertility Bridge and Fertility IQ show that that's not exactly true.

True for almost every fertility clinic review we read.

True for almost every fertility clinic review we read.

"No question, if a patient has a good result, they're more likely to recommend their fertility doctor/clinic," says Fertility IQ co-founder, Jake Anderson. "With that said, when we look at patients who had failed cycles, it's very clear who is likely to recommend the doctor, and who definitely won't."

It seems that the contrapositive is also valid; when we look at patients who've had successful cycles, it's clear who will be the source of future patients in the form of word-of-mouth referrals. Many people have success at their fertility centers and are "satisfied", but we see in these recommendations that it's compassion and personal connection that turn former IVF patients into zealous promoters of their practices. So the next time a competing fertility doctor tries to convince you that the patient experience is meaningless, and clinical outcomes are all that matter, don't feel disappointed when you can't change his mind. Eat his f'ing lunch.

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For strategy on improving the patient experience, read chapter 2 of my free e-book, The Ultimate Guide to Fertility Marketing, by clicking the button below.

 

 

 

The Truth Is Undefeated: A hard look at "questionable techniques" and the current state of fertility marketing

By Griffin Jones

You can tell I'm still relatively new to the fertility space. I don't appear in the top ten Google search results for "fertility marketing". I'm working on that, that's what brought me to check. I was both encouraged and discouraged by something else that did come up, however.

On the first page of Google search results for the term, "fertility marketing".

On the first page of Google search results for the term, "fertility marketing".

It's unfortunate for the field of reproductive medicine when our top search results for marketing include, "Many Fertility Clinics Use Questionable Marketing Techniques Online", a Jezebel reiteration of a Huffington Post article from three years ago. I would normally argue that we should avoid questionable marketing techniques by using only real patient testimonials and images. But authentic content does not fully address the issue of transparency in fertility marketing . The fundamental problem is that fertility clinics serve two different populations who sometimes overlap and who are sometimes at odds. Until we equally recognize both groups and the value of their experiences, I'm afraid we'll continue to have more problems. 

Flowers over figures

Both articles are sensational summaries of a report called Selling Art: An Empirical Assessment of Advertising on Fertility Clinics' Websites by Jim Hawkins, of the University of Houston Law Center. The report suggests that the content on fertility centers' websites may be misleading--using pictures of smiling babies and the words, "miracle" and "dream". The report offers criticism that these images and words may influence a prospective patient's decision instead of focusing on the Society for Advanced Reproductive Technology's (SART) published data on success rates. Such advertising may suggest that a pregnancy after IVF treatment is a certainty, when we know that in some cases, it's not even likely. 

It does seem that people sometimes feel misled. In a small survey I finished in April of 2015, patients told me that confusion about success rates was one of their greatest pain-points in selecting their fertility clinic. We also read in negative fertility doctor reviews that people sometimes feel rushed into IVF treatment. I recently spoke to a couple at Resolve's Night of Hope who felt the same way. It is certainly the case that some people feel that IVF is being sold to them. 

So why do I also find it encouraging that highly authoritative links to this report ranked so highly in the search results for "fertility marketing"? For the same reason I am building a company that will also rank among those results. I believe in a marketing strategy built on support and transparency. The report suggests that fertility clinic marketing should be more thoroughly regulated because of these questionable marketing tactics. My largest problem with that notion is that it shares a faulty belief with the lousy marketers that implement those tactics: obscurity works. Indeed, not being fully transparent may work in the short term. Some people clearly feel that they were persuaded with unrealistic expectations to pay for expensive IVF cycles. This strategy may have been tenable twenty years ago. Today's data, however, proves that people increasingly make decisions based on what they read in online reviews from their peers

You can run but you can't hide 

Fertility centers need to properly manage new patient expectations or their online ratings will suffer. Social proof in the form of online reviews should be the cornerstone of every good fertility clinic's marketing efforts. If any prospective patients or patient advocates read this post, I implore you to check the reviews of a provider before you decide on them. Investigate both the fertility practice and the reproductive endocrinologist (RE) on Yelp, Health Grades, Vitals, ZocDoc, RateMDs, Google reviews, or whichever of those are the most used in your area. Don't look at the star rating alone, but pay attention to the comments. If there are enough reviews, you will be able to get an idea of the culture of the practice or physician you are considering.

I don't know if fertility practices should be required to post their success rates, but I certainly think that they should post them. Patients are looking for that information and if they don't find it from you, it will be from a site like fertilitysuccessrates.com or from one of your competitors. Clinics should be transparent with success rate info and create content explaining the complex data to patients. 

Patients will find your success rates from one website or another. Fertilitysuccessrates.com

Patients will find your success rates from one website or another. Fertilitysuccessrates.com

Miracles happen and dreams are real 

I disagree that it would be appropriate to remove baby pictures and words like "dream" and "miracle" from your site.Those words belong to the patients themselves. If you look at the Facebook pages of nearly any fertility clinic in America, there is almost certainly a photo post from a happy patient that includes the word, "miracle". That child truly is a miracle for the parents that ventured that hard, lonely journey for so long. Their fertility specialist and their practice helped bring that miracle into existence. And for those couples and individuals that are struggling with infertility, it is their dream to have a baby of their own, a dream stronger than any other. We should speak to people in the language that they use, especially when it's based on results you've achieved. Your practice exists because people vividly dream of a miracle. Ideally, we should use baby pictures from actual patients. I think it's time to get the HIPAA release forms ready. The authentic account of someone who has actually realized their dream  is critical motivation for people under enormous emotional stress who are making a complicated medical decision. Sadly, however, we know that dream will not come true, in that form, for many people. So we must recognize the value of two communities rooted in the journey of infertility.

The word miracle belongs to the infertility community.

The word miracle belongs to the infertility community.

Serving two communities at the same time

I will oversimplify the infertility community for the sake of fundamentally understanding our responsibilities to them. As I see it, the infertility community is one population of people that becomes two. There are those who have ended their journey by achieving their dream of a biological child. In parallel, there are those who are still very much on their journey who may never realize that version of their dream. I hope this is the beginning of a much longer dialogue, because not recognizing the significance of both groups' feelings leads to many problems. We often hear complaints from patients without children when little ones are in the waiting room. Yet, we hear grievances from patients with children when they are asked not to have their child in the sitting area. For one group, Facebook and Instagram are places to celebrate their triumph over the darkest period of their lives. For the other group, they are in the midst of darkness and every pregnancy announcement on Facebook and every baby photo on Instagram is excruciatingly painful . Both communities have an inalienable right to the way they feel. These two communities overlap and we serve both of them. Because we're serving two communities, we have to be able to offer them a variety of benefits or some will never get value from their experience with us. I think fertility centers need to consider themselves agents of help beyond clinical treatment. Both groups need access to support; a peer support group member should never have to find out about her support group on her own. To better serve both populations, we need to

  • Send patients home with information on support groups in their area. RESOLVE facilitates infertility patient support groups in most mid-size to large U.S. metro areas and Fertility Matters is their peer in Canada. These are only two examples of support networks. There are patient advocacy groups and countless independent support groups throughout North America. I believe it's our responsibility to promote support groups when they ask for our help in distributing their information.
  • Empower people on social media. Whether it's on your fertility practice's Facebook page, or in a private forum, people coping with infertility use social media to connect with people who know their struggle. Promote RESOLVE Fertility Matters, and other groups online and share their groups if they ask you to. We don't not need to participate in these support forums (it may be better if we don't), but simply connect the people who are interested in them.
  • Give patients a list of popular infertility blogs and infertility podcasts so that they can interact with people who share their experience. 

Can you grow your practice by reconciling your results as a "miracle worker" with empirical expectation setting? I am building a business with my vote of confidence that it's the best way to do so.

Setting up for success

There are real life examples of the virtuous cycle I propose--attract new patients with the experience of delighted former patients, offer support and other resources, temper with very realistic expectations, and repeat. Dr. Ilan Tur-Kaspa is one of the highest rated REs in the Chicagoland area. I spoke with him about his approach. Dr. Tur-Kaspa says that the number of new patients that tell him they chose him because of his online ratings has increased. He credits a strong emphasis on properly managing expectations with the patient before treatment. "We talk a lot about the difference between disappointment and surprise," Tur-Kaspa says. "Whatever the probability of success is, it is important to communicate that in the terms of the probability of failure. i.e. if there is a 30% chance of success, we should communicate that there is a 70% chance that it won't work. The patient should preferably  acknowledge the odds of failure. Wait until they say 'I understand'".

When a patient looks at your online reviews on a site like ratemds (pictured), they are one click away from every other RE in your city. We want your reviews to be the best they can be.

When a patient looks at your online reviews on a site like ratemds (pictured), they are one click away from every other RE in your city. We want your reviews to be the best they can be.

I'm not a physician, so I certainly can't advise physicians on how to speak to their patients. Nor do I want to offer an incomplete solution, because I see that positivity is hugely important.  I'm simply a marketer who sees the impact that clear expectations have on the public image of the practice. Some marketers may ignore expectation setting for the sake of scheduling more IVF cycles in the short term. A good marketer will use the patient delight that comes from proper education as the pillar of their marketing strategy. For highly rated REs and fertility clinics, those reviews belong front and center on your website. A window to Yelp and Facebook  provide a balance to the testimonials that you've selected . It's okay for patients to see the occasional one-star review. Not every one will be satisfied 100% of the time. I believe that when we publicly acknowledge that, we begin to ensure that people are satisfied as much as possible.

The truth is undefeated (eventually)

We don't have to use "questionable marketing tactics" because they won't grow our practices over the long term. For those that embrace transparency and connection to support, market share will grow and marketing will be more effective and less expensive. We have to provide the best possible patient experience in order to build public social proof. That social proof, tempered with clear expectations and information, is the best way to attract new patients. In order to preserve this virtuous cycle, delighted patients bringing in more patients, we have to recognize the dynamics of both populations in the infertility community, and the equal worth of their experiences. 

The Sacred Scroll of Infertility: 8 reasons fertility clinics can't afford to ignore Instagram in 2016

By Griffin Jones

This is worth saying again. Instagram is an insanely powerful social media channel for fertility marketing. I don't say this because data proves that Instagram is the second largest social network in the world. Twitter and Linkedin are large social networks too, but I typically don't recommend that fertility clinics spend too much time with them. They just aren't places where people usually talk about children or the journey of infertility. Instagram is different. 

The #infertilitycommunity on Instagram is an extremely supportive peer-network. The content ranges from endearment to levity to humor to heartbreak.

The #infertilitycommunity on Instagram is an extremely supportive peer-network. The content ranges from endearment to levity to humor to heartbreak.

I talked about the 7 most powerful ways clinics can use Instagram for fertility marketing, but I think I understated what makes Instagram so important to individuals and couples coping with infertility. Fertility clinics can't afford to ignore Instagram because

  1. IVF patients are on Instagram. Research shows that 55% of women ages 18 to 29 and 28% of women ages 30 to 49 are active on Instagram.
  2. Instagram is a place for people to connect with others about their struggle with infertility. The #infertility and #ttc (trying to conceive) hashtags account for over 110,000 and 329,000 posts, respectively. 
  3. Infertility bloggers and podcasters use Instagram as one of their primary avenues to promote their content and engage their audiences.
  4. People create Instagram accounts for the singular reason of infertility. I wish I had a way of quantifying this for you, but if you browse through the #ttccommunity, you will find that most of the accounts include keywords like journey, ttc, waiting, baby, PCOS, etc. 
  5. Instagram is a scroll of the infertility language. Do you know what DH, AF, BFP, and BFN mean? They do. If you don't (I didn't), RESOLVE has a great dictionary of the infertility language
  6. Instagram is the second largest social media channel in the world. Ok, that does count for something.
  7. Parents post baby pictures on Instagram. Do they ever.
  8. Instagram is a referral source. There is no re-posting in Instagram, instead people tag their friends in the comment of a photo if they want their friend to see it. Example: If you post a picture of your amazing nurses on Instagram, this may offer the opportunity for a delighted former patient to tag a friend of hers to see the photo of her amazing care team. 

Instagram is such a critical tool for IVF marketing because it draws so much attention from the infertility community. It is a support network that offers humor, encouragement, counsel, and companionship. Fertility centers can use this social media platform to attract new IVF patients if they can provide the value that people struggling with infertility are looking for on Instagram.

If you want to use Instagram and other social media to attract more infertility patients, read Chapter 3 of my free e-book, Digital Marketing for Fertility Centers: How to Use Digital Media to Acquire New IVF Patients in 2016. 

The 7 Most Powerful Ways for Fertility Centers to Use Instagram

By Griffin Jones

What is the most frustrating thing about managing social media for your fertility center? If I ask this question to enough people, sure enough, this answer will be fairly common: there are too many platforms. How do we participate in all of them? 

Ready for the good news? You don't. I'll make this much simpler for you. All we need to do is reverse-engineer the attention of the patient. What media do IVF patients spend the most time with, and how does it relate to their struggle with infertility?

When we frame the question in this way, we easily see that Instagram is one of the most important social media platforms for fertility centers to participate in. 

  1. IVF patients are on Instagram. 55% of women ages 18 to 29 and 28% of women ages 30 to 49 are active on Instagram.
  2. Instagram is a place for people to connect with others about their struggle with infertility. The #infertility and #ttc (trying to conceive) hashtags account for over 110,000 and 329,000 posts, respectively. 

Because of the structure of Instagram, it can be trickier than Facebook to interact with your community due to HIPAA regulations. I recommend against following patients back on Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat. There's no law against it, but it could be argued as disclosure of a patient-physician relationship

So how do you engage your community on Instagram if HIPAA prevents you from participating in a more fluid and natural interaction? Here are some things you can do.

marketing for fertility centers
  1. Include it in your social media policy. Every healthcare practice needs a social media policy. You can e-mail me if you would like me to send you a free template, but you should always have your practice attorney customize it to your needs. Simply explain in plain English, that your practice will not follow back people that follow you on your Instagram account. While you would love to, your first priority is patient privacy and adhering to HIPAA regulations.
  2. Post the link to your fertility clinic's social media policy here in your Instagram profile (image above). 
  3. Let people find you. Post photos of your team: the practice picnic, a group hug of the nurses, an RE's birthday, are all appropriate for Instagram. Once you start posting original content, that offers something for people to comment on.
  4. Link your Instagram account to your Facecbook page and website. Give people a reason to follow. "See how we bond as a team".
  5. Use hashtags. There are so many hashtags relevant to infertility that it merits its own post. Start with #ttc and #infertility and you will find their derivatives.
  6. Respond to comments. Once people comment on your photo, you can respond. I suggest referring to them by their Instagram username, rather than their name. Also, just be careful not to add any new information to the conversation. A heartfelt thank you will do.
  7. Post video responses. In my opinion, I see this as the greatest opportunity for fertility centers on Instagram. When people give you love through comments on your posts (the Instagram equivalent to reviews), you can post a fifteen second video thanking them, telling them how wonderful it made you feel. Don't tag their username in the post, rather reply to one of their comments on your posts to notify them that you posted a video reply for them.

Do you use Instagram for your practice? What have you found?

Forget Twitter: The 2 Most Important Social Networks for Fertility Centers

By Griffin Jones

It's annoying, isn't it? So many social networks come and go, how can a Reproductive Endocrinologist and her practice manager be expected to be fully engaged in a dozen social media platforms?  The task becomes much less daunting when we reverse engineer our patients' attention. We don't have to be experts of every social network, we just need to know on which our prospective patients spend the most time.

 In 2017, I may well have new recommendations regarding into which platforms you should invest your time and resources. Through 2016, however, the two social media networks on which every fertility center should be present are Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook can be the best review site for fertility centers as well as a referral source.

Facebook can be the best review site for fertility centers as well as a referral source.

1.    Facebook. 
Facebook is by far the largest, and most widely used social network in the world. 70% of Facebook users check their accounts daily, with 43% of users checking every day .
There are 49 million women between the ages of 25 and 45 on Facebook in the United States and Canada. The ad targeting capability on Facebook is unparalleled to any other medium, period.

Yet, on their own, none of these are reasons for your fertility center to be on Facebook. The reason fertility centers need to be active on Facebook is because content of babies and children is central to the DNA of the platform. 97% of US mothers who use Facebook every day, post pictures of their children . If your practice is active on Facebook, you know that former patients will post pictures of their children from every occasion to your Facebook timeline, sometimes on the day of delivery.

Facebook is also a meeting point for peer support. The Infertility Inspirations community has over 13,000 members for example. Dozens of other closed groups account for thousands of members each.

2.    Instagram. 
Instagram has surpassed Twitter to become the second largest social media network in the world . It took Instagram only eight months to reach 100 million photo uploads. The growth rate of Instagram is astonishing. But again, it’s not Instagram’s massive numbers that make it a necessity for fertility centers. Like Facebook, baby pictures and inspirational content are inherent to the platform. The popular #ttc (trying to conceive) hashtag on Instagram counts for more than 300,000 posts. Related hashtags, #ttccommunity and #ttcsisters account for more than 25,000 and 67,000 respectively. 

The number of emerging social networks can appear overwhelming for an already swamped RE and practice administrator. But your practice does not have to be, nor should be, involved in more than a few. Social networks require a commitment of time, energy, and resources. One should be reliably served before beginning an additional. Priority is determined by the social nature of the network and the attention of the patient.  In 2016, Facebook and Instagram are the two most important platforms for fertility clinics to utilize. 

In taking my own advice, I have admittedly neglected Pinterest. Is your fertility center active on Pinterest? Please tell me about it, I would love to hear what you've found.